6 Things That Made Training For My First 5K Less Dreadful

The following post was originally featured on House Tweaking and written by Dana Miller, who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

After mentioning the completion of my first 5K a few weeks ago, I received some questions regarding my training. I thought it would be most helpful to just lay everything out in post form for ease of reference. FYI: I’ve always been a physically active person but never by means of running. This information is meant for novice runners like me whose goal is to run an entire 5K. If you have any running experience you may find these tips to be too rudimentary. On your mark. Get set. Let’s go!

1. Runner-friendly apps. When I signed up for the 5K, I had no idea how to train for a long distance race. I had no internal gauge to determine how fast or how far I was running. (Spoiler alert: I was slow and not running very far at all.) Steve downloaded 5K Runner onto my iPhone and I used it for the first month or so of my training. It’s basically an audio coach that talks you through a walk / run / walk workout three times per week. For the first 2-3 weeks, I was extremely discouraged. I could finish the workouts but felt completely spent during and after. My breathing was erratic when I ran. My legs hurt like crazy all the time ¨C even on my rest days. I was seriously doubting my ability to run 3+ miles without stopping to walk when I could barely finish a 1-mile walk / run at a snail’s pace. I said things to myself like, “I’m just not a runner.” “Something isn’t right. My legs aren’t supposed to hurt this badly.” “It doesn’t feel natural when I run.” “I can always back out.” I even half-wished I would pass out like I used to so I would have an excuse not to run.

But somewhere around the 4-week mark of training, I noticed a shift. I had more control over my breathing. My legs weren’t hurting as much. I was experiencing natural “highs” after my runs which kind of made me look forward to the next run. Instead of focusing on how far away I was from my goal, I was able to reflect on how far I had come.

The kids and I visited my grandparents in Florida in early August. I mistakenly forgot to pack my phone. My first thought was, “Well, guess I won’t be able to run because I can’t run without someone / something telling me when and how.” It was a lame excuse and I knew it but that was my rationalization. Then I saw my grandma (who had a knee replacement last year) waking up early every morning to meet her girlfriends at the neighborhood pool for water aerobics and I thought, “If she can do that, I can make an effort to run a few times this week.” And so I did.

Without my 5K Runner app, I decided to borrow a wristwatch from my grandma and run until I needed to walk. To my surprise, I ran for 11 minutes without walking! It was the longest continuous run I had completed. I walked for two minutes then ran for another eight. My phone showed up in the mail a few days later but I ditched the 5K Runner app and stuck to my 20-25 minute wristwatch workout, running until I absolutely had to walk, walking for 1-2 minutes then finishing with a shorter run. By the end of my visit, I could run ~15 minutes without stopping to walk.

When I returned home, I added Map My Run to my phone to document my routes, distances, splits and overall times. I was running 2-3 times per week. Seven weeks into my training, I was able to run two miles without stopping to walk. That was the moment when I actually believed I could reach the 3.2-mile mark if I kept at it. I gradually added snippets of distance to those two miles and I completed my first unofficial 5K two and a half weeks before the race.

2. Runner-friendly gadgets. Starting out I ran with my phone in hand and the volume on high so I could hear the audio coach. Steve made fun of me and quickly bought an armband holster for my phone. (For the record, he’s the gadget lover in the relationship. I avoid them at all costs.) I tried adding a pair of basic ear buds from our junk drawer but I was continually adjusting them so they wouldn’t fall out, which they did regardless. And what to do with the dangling, bouncing wires?! It was annoying. Reluctantly, I shelled out money for wireless bluetooth earphones. They made me a gadget lover. They didn’t fall out (they come with ear buds and ear loops in various sizes for a custom fit) and they blocked out the sound of my ragged breathing. Not being able to hear myself breathe made such a difference to me! It’s as if I couldn’t hear how tired I was. The wireless aspect was completely freeing, too. I could focus on my form and pace instead of wrangling wires.

3. The right footwear. As mentioned above, pain in my legs from the knees down was my biggest hurdle early on. I had expected some pain but this was almost unbearable at times. I tried improving my gait by emphasizing a midfoot strike. It definitely felt better than my natural (i.e., very wrong) side-to-side stride but I was still in pain.

I did some reading online and determined improper support of my high arches was partly to blame. It probably didn’t help that I didn’t own true running shoes. I read a bunch of reviews online and ordered a pair of Brooks Pure Cadence 2 running shoes. I didn’t care what color they were. I just ordered the cheapest ones in my size from Amazon. I loved them right out of the box. There was no break in period, no blisters. With proper cushioning in all the right places, my gait improved even more. Maintaining proper running form required less effort and felt “natural” for the first time in my life. (I followed these guidelines for proper running form.) The pain in my knees, shins and feet improved almost immediately. My arches never felt better.

However, the pain in my calves did not improve. In fact, I even experienced intense swelling at one point. My legs never swelled during any of my pregnancies, but the pain reminded me of how my legs used to feel after a 12-hour workday standing in the pharmacy while pregnant. Back then, I wore compression stockings for relief. I wondered if it would be weird to wear them while running. A quick Amazon search revealed that compression socks for runners actually do exist! I had no idea. I snagged a highly rated pair of performance run socks in pink. (Because it was the cheapest color and I don’t care what I look like when I run.) THESE SOCKS WERE GAME CHANGERS! For me, the claims of more comfort, less fatigue and quicker recovery completely held up in real life. It should come as no surprise that my first run in the socks was the 11-minute wristwatch run I mentioned in #1. Sometimes I even wore them for comfort on rest days. #sohot

4. Ideal running conditions. At first, I ran whenever I had a break in my schedule. The kids were home from school for the summer and squeezing in a run wasn’t always easy. I ran when I could. It didn’t take me long to figure out I was NOT a night runner. I didn’t like not being able to see what was around me and I had trouble falling asleep afterwards. Running in the stifling hot summer afternoons was excruciating. Also, I learned that running shortly after eating gave me intense runner’s heartburn. For these reasons, I made every effort to get my runs in first thing in the morning. Later on as summer dwindled and the temps cooled, I was able to go for pleasant afternoon runs but morning time really was my running sweet spot.

When I started training, I had visions of running in all these cool places around my city. But what I realized was that if the location required me to get in a vehicle, I was less likely to run. It seemed like too much effort. Eventually, I settled on a route in my neighborhood. (After all, a legit running club runs through our ‘hood every Tuesday.) It’s mostly flat and quiet with little to no traffic and the kicker is that it’s just steps from my front door.

I had a few friends offer to run with me but I never took them up on it. For one, I thought I was so terrible that I would hold them back. But mostly I preferred running alone. It was me time, albeit grueling. (That might be an introvert thing.)

So, yeah, my ideal running conditions involved cool temps in the morning, an empty stomach, my trusty neighborhood route and just me. That’s when I felt and did my best. (Luckily, the conditions of the real race were quite similar.) Once I tried a different route on a HOT afternoon and it went horribly. There were hills, a construction zone, heavy traffic and no shoulder to run on. I walked a lot and it took me >45 minutes to finish. I vowed never to take that route again.

5. Patience. I don’t like doing things I’m not good at. It’s one of the reasons I didn’t attempt to run before this summer. (Fear was the other big factor.) I’m old enough to know that accomplishing a lofty goal requires hard work and time. I knew training for a 5K would be strenuous physically. I knew I wouldn’t be able to run 3 miles overnight. I gave myself ten weeks to train for the race. Still, I expected to see results sooner than I did. I had no choice but to be patient with my progress. I’m not going to lie. The first month sucked. Big time. I couldn’t run longer than a minute without needing to stop and walk at least the same amount of time or longer. The entire time I was running, I couldn’t wait to walk. I told Steve I would rather go through another au naturel birth than run a 5K. That’s where #6 came in and kept me going.

6. Inspiration. I found inspiration everywhere. For starters, Steve organized the Lift Up Autism 5K. I watched him spend so much of what little free time he had setting up an event website, getting people registered, creating the race route, organizing a group of volunteers, contacting sponsors, etc. all for a good cause and I wanted to support him. I also found it extremely inspiring to read about others’ first 5Ks. There’s a lot to be found by googling “first 5K race.” Dipping into others’ experiences helped me focus on endurance, reaching that 3.2 mile mark and finishing strong with a smile on my face.

I thought about my childhood neighbor and friend who now has the extremely challenging job of raising three children, two of which are severely autistic.

I thought about my dear girlfriend who experienced a traumatic labor and delivery which ultimately resulted in her losing her baby the same day he was born.

I thought about my own son, Layne, who was once on the autism spectrum and has grown into the most intelligent and sweetest ten-year-old I know.

I thought about my kids seeing me cross the finish line.

When my legs wanted to stop I thought about all the chronically ill people who would give anything to have healthy, tired legs.

During one run in Florida, I had just reached my goal for the day when a golf cart passed me carrying a severely disabled elderly woman. I was so ready to quit but I ran another two minutes just for her.

During a run in my neighborhood, I passed an elderly woman who frequently runs in the area. She looks as if she’s been a runner all her life and has the injuries and crippled posture to show for it. I had only planned on running 2 miles that day but ended up running 2.5 in honor of her.

During a week that Steve was out of town for work, the only way I could get in my run was to push Mabrey in a (non-jogging) stroller. The stroller is over a decade old. It’s the only stroller we’ve ever owned. The wheels are terribly squeaky and I fear it could collapse at any moment. That stroller was all over the road that day! I kept thinking it was too hard to run behind but then I thought about Mabrey and I wanted her to see me do something difficult. I finished a 5K run that day. Mabrey had no clue. She just liked going fast. The next time I ran stroller-less, it was so easy relative to that stroller run.

You get the point. Inspiration is everywhere if you want to find it. It’s yours for the taking. Use it to do good, hard things.

I completed a total of three 5K runs before the actual race. I posted a PR of 25:09 on race day. Out of 70 participants, I placed second. I was the first woman to cross the finish line. And I did it with a smile on my face.

After the race, my sister (who is an avid runner and has completed several marathons) asked me if I was hooked. I’m not entirely sure what my relationship with running is from here on out. I feel great. I’m probably in the best conditioning shape of my life. The fighter in me wants to get my time down but I don’t want chronic injuries. That being said, I ran a mile “for fun” this past weekend and posted my best mile time ever ¨C 7:14. I read somewhere that a 37- to 41-year-old is in the top 1% of their age group if they can run a mile in 6:48 or better. I turn 37 next month. I kinda want to try. For fun.

For me, the weirdest part about all of this is that I run for fun now?! Who am I.

Reading others’ experiences inspired me so much and I want to pay it forward. Have you ever completed a 5K? What were your training must-haves? One more thing: Do you use a music app or create playlists for running / working out? That’s the one thing I haven’t been able to nail down. Any songs you would recommend? I’m all ears. Hehe.

Image Source: House Tweaking

6 Things That Made Training For My First 5K Less Dreadful

The following post was originally featured on House Tweaking and written by Dana Miller| who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

After mentioning the completion of my first 5K a few weeks ago| I received some questions regarding my training. I thought it would be most helpful to just lay everything out in post form for ease of reference. FYI: I’ve always been a physically active person but never by means of running. This information is meant for novice runners like me whose goal is to run an entire 5K. If you have any running experience you may find these tips to be too rudimentary. On your mark. Get set. Let’s go!

1. Runner-friendly apps. When I signed up for the 5K| I had no idea how to train for a long distance race. I had no internal gauge to determine how fast or how far I was running. (Spoiler alert: I was slow and not running very far at all.) Steve downloaded 5K Runner onto my iPhone and I used it for the first month or so of my training. It’s basically an audio coach that talks you through a walk / run / walk workout three times per week. For the first 2-3 weeks| I was extremely discouraged. I could finish the workouts but felt completely spent during and after. My breathing was erratic when I ran. My legs hurt like crazy all the time C even on my rest days. I was seriously doubting my ability to run 3+ miles without stopping to walk when I could barely finish a 1-mile walk / run at a snail’s pace. I said things to myself like| “I’m just not a runner.” “Something isn’t right. My legs aren’t supposed to hurt this badly.” “It doesn’t feel natural when I run.” “I can always back out.” I even half-wished I would pass out like I used to so I would have an excuse not to run.

But somewhere around the 4-week mark of training| I noticed a shift. I had more control over my breathing. My legs weren’t hurting as much. I was experiencing natural “highs” after my runs which kind of made me look forward to the next run. Instead of focusing on how far away I was from my goal| I was able to reflect on how far I had come.

The kids and I visited my grandparents in Florida in early August. I mistakenly forgot to pack my phone. My first thought was| “Well| guess I won’t be able to run because I can’t run without someone / something telling me when and how.” It was a lame excuse and I knew it but that was my rationalization. Then I saw my grandma (who had a knee replacement last year) waking up early every morning to meet her girlfriends at the neighborhood pool for water aerobics and I thought| “If she can do that| I can make an effort to run a few times this week.” And so I did.

Without my 5K Runner app| I decided to borrow a wristwatch from my grandma and run until I needed to walk. To my surprise| I ran for 11 minutes without walking! It was the longest continuous run I had completed. I walked for two minutes then ran for another eight. My phone showed up in the mail a few days later but I ditched the 5K Runner app and stuck to my 20-25 minute wristwatch workout| running until I absolutely had to walk| walking for 1-2 minutes then finishing with a shorter run. By the end of my visit| I could run ~15 minutes without stopping to walk.

When I returned home| I added Map My Run to my phone to document my routes| distances| splits and overall times. I was running 2-3 times per week. Seven weeks into my training| I was able to run two miles without stopping to walk. That was the moment when I actually believed I could reach the 3.2-mile mark if I kept at it. I gradually added snippets of distance to those two miles and I completed my first unofficial 5K two and a half weeks before the race.

2. Runner-friendly gadgets. Starting out I ran with my phone in hand and the volume on high so I could hear the audio coach. Steve made fun of me and quickly bought an armband holster for my phone. (For the record| he’s the gadget lover in the relationship. I avoid them at all costs.) I tried adding a pair of basic ear buds from our junk drawer but I was continually adjusting them so they wouldn’t fall out| which they did regardless. And what to do with the dangling| bouncing wires?! It was annoying. Reluctantly| I shelled out money for wireless bluetooth earphones. They made me a gadget lover. They didn’t fall out (they come with ear buds and ear loops in various sizes for a custom fit) and they blocked out the sound of my ragged breathing. Not being able to hear myself breathe made such a difference to me! It’s as if I couldn’t hear how tired I was. The wireless aspect was completely freeing| too. I could focus on my form and pace instead of wrangling wires.

3. The right footwear. As mentioned above| pain in my legs from the knees down was my biggest hurdle early on. I had expected some pain but this was almost unbearable at times. I tried improving my gait by emphasizing a midfoot strike. It definitely felt better than my natural (i.e.| very wrong) side-to-side stride but I was still in pain.

I did some reading online and determined improper support of my high arches was partly to blame. It probably didn’t help that I didn’t own true running shoes. I read a bunch of reviews online and ordered a pair of Brooks Pure Cadence 2 running shoes. I didn’t care what color they were. I just ordered the cheapest ones in my size from Amazon. I loved them right out of the box. There was no break in period| no blisters. With proper cushioning in all the right places| my gait improved even more. Maintaining proper running form required less effort and felt “natural” for the first time in my life. (I followed these guidelines for proper running form.) The pain in my knees| shins and feet improved almost immediately. My arches never felt better.

However| the pain in my calves did not improve. In fact| I even experienced intense swelling at one point. My legs never swelled during any of my pregnancies| but the pain reminded me of how my legs used to feel after a 12-hour workday standing in the pharmacy while pregnant. Back then| I wore compression stockings for relief. I wondered if it would be weird to wear them while running. A quick Amazon search revealed that compression socks for runners actually do exist! I had no idea. I snagged a highly rated pair of performance run socks in pink. (Because it was the cheapest color and I don’t care what I look like when I run.) THESE SOCKS WERE GAME CHANGERS! For me| the claims of more comfort| less fatigue and quicker recovery completely held up in real life. It should come as no surprise that my first run in the socks was the 11-minute wristwatch run I mentioned in #1. Sometimes I even wore them for comfort on rest days. #sohot

4. Ideal running conditions. At first| I ran whenever I had a break in my schedule. The kids were home from school for the summer and squeezing in a run wasn’t always easy. I ran when I could. It didn’t take me long to figure out I was NOT a night runner. I didn’t like not being able to see what was around me and I had trouble falling asleep afterwards. Running in the stifling hot summer afternoons was excruciating. Also| I learned that running shortly after eating gave me intense runner’s heartburn. For these reasons| I made every effort to get my runs in first thing in the morning. Later on as summer dwindled and the temps cooled| I was able to go for pleasant afternoon runs but morning time really was my running sweet spot.

When I started training| I had visions of running in all these cool places around my city. But what I realized was that if the location required me to get in a vehicle| I was less likely to run. It seemed like too much effort. Eventually| I settled on a route in my neighborhood. (After all| a legit running club runs through our ‘hood every Tuesday.) It’s mostly flat and quiet with little to no traffic and the kicker is that it’s just steps from my front door.

I had a few friends offer to run with me but I never took them up on it. For one| I thought I was so terrible that I would hold them back. But mostly I preferred running alone. It was me time| albeit grueling. (That might be an introvert thing.)

So| yeah| my ideal running conditions involved cool temps in the morning| an empty stomach| my trusty neighborhood route and just me. That’s when I felt and did my best. (Luckily| the conditions of the real race were quite similar.) Once I tried a different route on a HOT afternoon and it went horribly. There were hills| a construction zone| heavy traffic and no shoulder to run on. I walked a lot and it took me >45 minutes to finish. I vowed never to take that route again.

5. Patience. I don’t like doing things I’m not good at. It’s one of the reasons I didn’t attempt to run before this summer. (Fear was the other big factor.) I’m old enough to know that accomplishing a lofty goal requires hard work and time. I knew training for a 5K would be strenuous physically. I knew I wouldn’t be able to run 3 miles overnight. I gave myself ten weeks to train for the race. Still| I expected to see results sooner than I did. I had no choice but to be patient with my progress. I’m not going to lie. The first month sucked. Big time. I couldn’t run longer than a minute without needing to stop and walk at least the same amount of time or longer. The entire time I was running| I couldn’t wait to walk. I told Steve I would rather go through another au naturel birth than run a 5K. That’s where #6 came in and kept me going.

6. Inspiration. I found inspiration everywhere. For starters| Steve organized the Lift Up Autism 5K. I watched him spend so much of what little free time he had setting up an event website| getting people registered| creating the race route| organizing a group of volunteers| contacting sponsors| etc. all for a good cause and I wanted to support him. I also found it extremely inspiring to read about others’ first 5Ks. There’s a lot to be found by googling “first 5K race.” Dipping into others’ experiences helped me focus on endurance| reaching that 3.2 mile mark and finishing strong with a smile on my face.

I thought about my childhood neighbor and friend who now has the extremely challenging job of raising three children| two of which are severely autistic.

I thought about my dear girlfriend who experienced a traumatic labor and delivery which ultimately resulted in her losing her baby the same day he was born.

I thought about my own son| Layne| who was once on the autism spectrum and has grown into the most intelligent and sweetest ten-year-old I know.

I thought about my kids seeing me cross the finish line.

When my legs wanted to stop I thought about all the chronically ill people who would give anything to have healthy| tired legs.

During one run in Florida| I had just reached my goal for the day when a golf cart passed me carrying a severely disabled elderly woman. I was so ready to quit but I ran another two minutes just for her.

During a run in my neighborhood| I passed an elderly woman who frequently runs in the area. She looks as if she’s been a runner all her life and has the injuries and crippled posture to show for it. I had only planned on running 2 miles that day but ended up running 2.5 in honor of her.

During a week that Steve was out of town for work| the only way I could get in my run was to push Mabrey in a (non-jogging) stroller. The stroller is over a decade old. It’s the only stroller we’ve ever owned. The wheels are terribly squeaky and I fear it could collapse at any moment. That stroller was all over the road that day! I kept thinking it was too hard to run behind but then I thought about Mabrey and I wanted her to see me do something difficult. I finished a 5K run that day. Mabrey had no clue. She just liked going fast. The next time I ran stroller-less| it was so easy relative to that stroller run.

You get the point. Inspiration is everywhere if you want to find it. It’s yours for the taking. Use it to do good| hard things.

I completed a total of three 5K runs before the actual race. I posted a PR of 25:09 on race day. Out of 70 participants| I placed second. I was the first woman to cross the finish line. And I did it with a smile on my face.

After the race| my sister (who is an avid runner and has completed several marathons) asked me if I was hooked. I’m not entirely sure what my relationship with running is from here on out. I feel great. I’m probably in the best conditioning shape of my life. The fighter in me wants to get my time down but I don’t want chronic injuries. That being said| I ran a mile “for fun” this past weekend and posted my best mile time ever C 7:14. I read somewhere that a 37- to 41-year-old is in the top 1% of their age group if they can run a mile in 6:48 or better. I turn 37 next month. I kinda want to try. For fun.

For me| the weirdest part about all of this is that I run for fun now?! Who am I.

Reading others’ experiences inspired me so much and I want to pay it forward. Have you ever completed a 5K? What were your training must-haves? One more thing: Do you use a music app or create playlists for running / working out? That’s the one thing I haven’t been able to nail down. Any songs you would recommend? I’m all ears. Hehe.

Image Source: House Tweaking

All the Surprises of Running My First 5K Without Training a Mile

When our Fitness editor told me that I’d be running a 5K as a guest of the Tone It Up Retreat in Newport Beach, CA, several thoughts ran through my head after some initial laughter. Is it safe to run my first 5K without any training or preparation? Could I do it? Would I survive?

As someone who can barely walk home without panting, it was hard not to freak out a little. My friends’ and family’s responses went something like, “Oh, I don’t know, man.” The support was unreal.

Aside from a (sometimes) weekly dance class, I generally identify myself as a pretty inactive person. The last time I had competitively run a mile was in 8th grade PE ¡ª the last time I ran three miles? Oh, never. The running shoes I had purchased a month earlier for “motivation” barely left their box just the weekend before, and I could hardly call that a run. But I was so excited about this last-minute trip that I welcomed anything that was asked of me, including this 5K.

Fast-forward to the morning of when my nerves were stretching with me. Here I was, surrounded by 400 Tone It Up women, standing in my running shoes that had yet to be broken in.

Then, the shot was fired.

I started off slow, real slow. Ten minutes in, I was almost done with my first lap of four but my shins began to badly burn. Listening to Drake helped me push through to lap two when I thought, “OK, this isn’t bad. I got this.” But soon after, a fear of “Holy sh*t, I may not make it” quickly took over.

I tried to keep focused on the lyrics and my breathing, and it didn’t hurt that this was a Ros¨¦ 5K with some bubbly waiting for us at the finish line. Half an hour in and I was on my final lap. Minus a couple 10-second walk breaks, I had maintained a steady pace the entire time and this, my friends, blew my freaking mind. As I approached the end, I surprisingly felt energized enough to pick up the pace so I decided to go full speed to the finish line. Yes, there were many girls who had finished long before I had, but I ended my very first 5K at 37 minutes, and hey, I felt pretty damn good for pushing through.

My first 5K made me realize that my fitness potential was completely hindered by how I viewed running. Since then, I’ve become more open-minded to fitness in general and less fearful of pushing my body. My new perspective has inspired me to continue to explore my physical limits and to even consider signing up for another 5K or even a 10K! But after some actual preparation next time around, of course.

In the meantime, here’s seven things I learned from my first experience.

    Go at your own pace: As badly as I wanted to keep up with some of the runners, I knew I’d burn out quick if I tried. Instead, I kept slow, light steps throughout.A good playlist is everything: If it weren’t for the help of Drake and Queen Bey, I’m really not sure if I could’ve made it on my own.It’s OK to walk: There were many women who were killing it, but there were plenty of others who walked the race, too. Regardless of what anyone else is doing, just focus on what your body is capable of.Only take sips of water: While the sun was beating down hard on us, I had to resist the urge to gulp down. I took only enough sips to get me through each lap to prevent cramps from slowing me down.Nothing gets a girl running like Ros¨¦: No, seriously, you should’ve seen some of these runners go. Why every race doesn’t end with some is my question.It’s all mental: I had the wrong outlook coming into the race, first of all. I already set myself up for failure based on what I thought I knew about my body. Especially feeling intimidated by the more experienced women around me, it was easy to get dissuaded. But self-encouragement can really make all the difference.You might surprise yourself: I definitely did. I was either going to embarrass or impress myself and thankfully, it was the latter. You really don’t know what you’re capable of until you try.

Image Source: Tone It Up

All the Surprises of Running My First 5K Without Training a Mile

When our Fitness editor told me that I’d be running a 5K as a guest of the Tone It Up Retreat in Newport Beach| CA| several thoughts ran through my head after some initial laughter. Is it safe to run my first 5K without any training or preparation? Could I do it? Would I survive?

As someone who can barely walk home without panting| it was hard not to freak out a little. My friends’ and family’s responses went something like| “Oh| I don’t know| man.” The support was unreal.

Aside from a (sometimes) weekly dance class| I generally identify myself as a pretty inactive person. The last time I had competitively run a mile was in 8th grade PE ¡ª the last time I ran three miles? Oh| never. The running shoes I had purchased a month earlier for “motivation” barely left their box just the weekend before| and I could hardly call that a run. But I was so excited about this last-minute trip that I welcomed anything that was asked of me| including this 5K.

Fast-forward to the morning of when my nerves were stretching with me. Here I was| surrounded by 400 Tone It Up women| standing in my running shoes that had yet to be broken in.

Then| the shot was fired.

I started off slow| real slow. Ten minutes in| I was almost done with my first lap of four but my shins began to badly burn. Listening to Drake helped me push through to lap two when I thought| “OK| this isn’t bad. I got this.” But soon after| a fear of “Holy sh*t| I may not make it” quickly took over.

I tried to keep focused on the lyrics and my breathing| and it didn’t hurt that this was a Rosé 5K with some bubbly waiting for us at the finish line. Half an hour in and I was on my final lap. Minus a couple 10-second walk breaks| I had maintained a steady pace the entire time and this| my friends| blew my freaking mind. As I approached the end| I surprisingly felt energized enough to pick up the pace so I decided to go full speed to the finish line. Yes| there were many girls who had finished long before I had| but I ended my very first 5K at 37 minutes| and hey| I felt pretty damn good for pushing through.

My first 5K made me realize that my fitness potential was completely hindered by how I viewed running. Since then| I’ve become more open-minded to fitness in general and less fearful of pushing my body. My new perspective has inspired me to continue to explore my physical limits and to even consider signing up for another 5K or even a 10K! But after some actual preparation next time around| of course.

In the meantime| here’s seven things I learned from my first experience.

    <Go at your own pace: As badly as I wanted to keep up with some of the runners| I knew I’d burn out quick if I tried. Instead| I kept slow| light steps throughout.A good playlist is everything: If it weren’t for the help of Drake and Queen Bey| I’m really not sure if I could’ve made it on my own.It’s OK to walk: There were many women who were killing it| but there were plenty of others who walked the race| too. Regardless of what anyone else is doing| just focus on what your body is capable of.Only take sips of water: While the sun was beating down hard on us| I had to resist the urge to gulp down. I took only enough sips to get me through each lap to prevent cramps from slowing me down.Nothing gets a girl running like Ros¨¦: No| seriously| you should’ve seen some of these runners go. Why every race doesn’t end with some is my question.It’s all mental: I had the wrong outlook coming into the race| first of all. I already set myself up for failure based on what I thought I knew about my body. Especially feeling intimidated by the more experienced women around me| it was easy to get dissuaded. But self-encouragement can really make all the difference.You might surprise yourself: I definitely did. I was either going to embarrass or impress myself and thankfully| it was the latter. You really don’t know what you’re capable of until you try.

Image Source: Tone It Up

How to Run a Faster 5K

You’ve been running regularly for some time and have completed a few 5K fun runs. But now it’s time to step it up and take this distance seriously. Here are some tips to help you beat your personal record when running 3.1 miles.

During TrainingAdd speedwork: If you want to run a faster 5K, then you have to practice running faster. Coach Andrew Kastor recommends adding 80-meter sprints into your training schedule, and here’s his plan for running a faster 5K in four weeks. Remember: sprinting can be hard on the body, so make sure to start off with shorter sprints and build up to the full 80 meters, especially if you’re new to speedwork.Add short uphills: Hills require strength and endurance, so if you practice them during your training, then you’ll develop speed and muscle power, and just as with plyometrics (jump exercises), hill sprints will increase flexibility in your muscles and tendons, which reduces your risk of injury. In your training, tackle shorter steep hills (about 6 to 10 percent incline). Sprint up for 10 seconds, and then walk downhill backward to avoid pressure on the knees. Repeat, eventually building up to eight 10-second sprints. It’s a surefire way to stronger, faster legs.Incorporate strength-training moves that target your shins, calves, quads, glutes, and core: Running alone won’t increase your speed. You need to strengthen the muscles that make you move so your actions will be more powerful and more efficient. Incorporate variations of squats, lunges, step-ups, calf raises, bent over rows, and these three booty moves from celebrity trainer David Kirsch.Become familiar with the route: Obtain a map of the 5K course, and if the route is open (like in a neighborhood or wooded trail), then practice running it to familiarize yourself with the hills, curves, and mile markers. Knowing the course in advance will give you confidence and an added advantage over runners who are tackling it for the first time.

On Race DayNourish and hydrate: Eat a low-fiber meal that contains protein and easily digestible carbs. Make sure it’s under 200 calories and eaten one to two hours before you run. My favorite is peanut butter on a banana, but find what works for you. Drink 14 to 20 ounces of fluid two to three hours before you run.Warm up: It may only be 3.1 miles, but if you warm up with some brisk walking or light jogging 25 minutes before the race, then not only will you prevent injury, but also, your muscles will be ready to go once the race begins.For uphills: Proper form is key. Keep your head and chest upright and your shoulders and hands relaxed (no clenched fists). Take shorter strides and push off and up, not into the hill, to add spring to your movements, while keeping your feet close to the ground. Don’t make your legs do all the work ¡ª pump your arms to add power to each step. Gaze up the hill to where you’re going rather than at the ground. It helps you see the progress you’re making, which motivates you to keep going. Tackle the first two-thirds of the hill at a slower, relaxed pace, and then accelerate toward the end. For downhills: Use gravity here, and allow your body to take a longer stride with each step. Relax your leg muscles and focus on leaning forward into the hill and landing softly to avoid jarring your knees and other joints. For flats: Focus on moving efficiently and with minimal effort. You can achieve this by shifting your shoulders slightly in front of your hips, allowing gravity to naturally pull you forward. Capitalize on this forward momentum to conserve energy while increasing your pace on flat sections of the race without much muscular effort. For curves: Pay attention to turns in the course, and move over as soon as possible to hug the curves, shortening the distance.Finish strong: Knowing the course is extremely helpful, as miles aren’t always marked on 5Ks. Take a negative-split approach to the race; once you hit the halfway mark, begin to pick up the pace (passing runners will give you an added boost of confidence). For the last quarter mile, go for the gold and sprint to the finish line.Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Kat Borchat

How to Run a Faster 5K

You’ve been running regularly for some time and have completed a few 5K fun runs. But now it’s time to step it up and take this distance seriously. Here are some tips to help you beat your personal record when running 3.1 miles.

During TrainingAdd speedwork: If you want to run a faster 5K| then you have to practice running faster. Coach Andrew Kastor recommends adding 80-meter sprints into your training schedule| and here’s his plan for running a faster 5K in four weeks. Remember: sprinting can be hard on the body| so make sure to start off with shorter sprints and build up to the full 80 meters| especially if you’re new to speedwork.Add short uphills: Hills require strength and endurance| so if you practice them during your training| then you’ll develop speed and muscle power| and just as with plyometrics (jump exercises)| hill sprints will increase flexibility in your muscles and tendons| which reduces your risk of injury. In your training| tackle shorter steep hills (about 6 to 10 percent incline). Sprint up for 10 seconds| and then walk downhill backward to avoid pressure on the knees. Repeat| eventually building up to eight 10-second sprints. It’s a surefire way to stronger| faster legs.Incorporate strength-training moves that target your shins| calves| quads| glutes| and core: Running alone won’t increase your speed. You need to strengthen the muscles that make you move so your actions will be more powerful and more efficient. Incorporate variations of squats| lunges| step-ups| calf raises| bent over rows| and these three booty moves from celebrity trainer David Kirsch.Become familiar with the route: Obtain a map of the 5K course| and if the route is open (like in a neighborhood or wooded trail)| then practice running it to familiarize yourself with the hills| curves| and mile markers. Knowing the course in advance will give you confidence and an added advantage over runners who are tackling it for the first time.

On Race DayNourish and hydrate: Eat a low-fiber meal that contains protein and easily digestible carbs. Make sure it’s under 200 calories and eaten one to two hours before you run. My favorite is peanut butter on a banana| but find what works for you. Drink 14 to 20 ounces of fluid two to three hours before you run.Warm up: It may only be 3.1 miles| but if you warm up with some brisk walking or light jogging 25 minutes before the race| then not only will you prevent injury| but also| your muscles will be ready to go once the race begins.For uphills: Proper form is key. Keep your head and chest upright and your shoulders and hands relaxed (no clenched fists). Take shorter strides and push off and up| not into the hill| to add spring to your movements| while keeping your feet close to the ground. Don’t make your legs do all the work pump your arms to add power to each step. Gaze up the hill to where you’re going rather than at the ground. It helps you see the progress you’re making| which motivates you to keep going. Tackle the first two-thirds of the hill at a slower| relaxed pace| and then accelerate toward the end. For downhills: Use gravity here| and allow your body to take a longer stride with each step. Relax your leg muscles and focus on leaning forward into the hill and landing softly to avoid jarring your knees and other joints. For flats: Focus on moving efficiently and with minimal effort. You can achieve this by shifting your shoulders slightly in front of your hips| allowing gravity to naturally pull you forward. Capitalize on this forward momentum to conserve energy while increasing your pace on flat sections of the race without much muscular effort. For curves: Pay attention to turns in the course| and move over as soon as possible to hug the curves| shortening the distance.Finish strong: Knowing the course is extremely helpful| as miles aren’t always marked on 5Ks. Take a negative-split approach to the race; once you hit the halfway mark| begin to pick up the pace (passing runners will give you an added boost of confidence). For the last quarter mile| go for the gold and sprint to the finish line.Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Kat Borchat

The Secrets to a Successful 5K

If you’ve recently signed up for a 5K, congratulations ¡ª?committing to a run is often the hardest part. But even with entry secured, you might be unsure of how to prep properly before the big day. Here are a few easy steps to help get you to the starting line with a stride in your step.

Pick a purpose: Decide what your goal is and keep that in mind during training (and the race itself). If it’s to jump-start a fitness routine or lose weight, you may not be as concerned with your finish time. But if you want to beat a personal best or qualify for another race after your 5K, make sure your training allows for this.

Create a training schedule: Sticking with a schedule like this six-week running guide will help you stay on track without overwhelming you physically. Make sure to give yourself plenty of time to train so you can increase both mileage and time while still allowing the body time to rest.

Keep motivated: Whether you decide to run a 5K with a group or find a running buddy to train with, a friend can help keep you accountable. Sharing your goals and scheduling running workouts together will help keep momentum up and ensure that you stay consistent ¡ª?especially during those times when you feel low.

Don’t do too much too fast: Keep the old saying “slow and steady wins the race” in mind while training. It’s important to not push yourself too hard, too fast ¡ª?you want to avoid injury so that you can actually get to the race. A good rule of thumb is to increase your mileage by no more than 10 percent each week. Jot down your plan and increase gradually. Motivation is key, but be careful it doesn’t drive you to bite off more than you can chew.

Train in the right gear: Feeling comfortable during the race, and in training, is crucial to your success. Never race in gear ¡ª especially shoes ¡ª that you haven’t tested before. Run in clothing that is broken in that you know won’t ride up or cause blisters. If you need a new pair of shoes and have time to break them in before race day, go to a running specialty store to get a gait analysis and test the shoes out on a real track. Remember the saying “cotton is rotten” when dressing to train. It makes clothes heavy, sweaty, and wet.

Start strong, finish strong: Positive visualization will help you before the race and during. While you train, picture yourself on the track and tune out any environmental factors. The race will be full of people running right alongside you, so the more you practice this technique, the better your performance will be on the big day. Keep your eyes on the prize as you complete your 5K and keep all of the reasons you decided to do it circling in your head. This will help you feel even more accomplished as you cross the finish line.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography

The Secrets to a Successful 5K

If you’ve recently signed up for a 5K| congratulations ¡ª?committing to a run is often the hardest part. But even with entry secured| you might be unsure of how to prep properly before the big day. Here are a few easy steps to help get you to the starting line with a stride in your step.

Pick a purpose: Decide what your goal is and keep that in mind during training (and the race itself). If it’s to jump-start a fitness routine or lose weight| you may not be as concerned with your finish time. But if you want to beat a personal best or qualify for another race after your 5K| make sure your training allows for this.

Create a training schedule: Sticking with a schedule like this six-week running guide will help you stay on track without overwhelming you physically. Make sure to give yourself plenty of time to train so you can increase both mileage and time while still allowing the body time to rest.

Keep motivated: Whether you decide to run a 5K with a group or find a running buddy to train with| a friend can help keep you accountable. Sharing your goals and scheduling running workouts together will help keep momentum up and ensure that you stay consistent ¡ª?especially during those times when you feel low.

Don’t do too much too fast: Keep the old saying “slow and steady wins the race” in mind while training. It’s important to not push yourself too hard| too fast ¡ª?you want to avoid injury so that you can actually get to the race. A good rule of thumb is to increase your mileage by no more than 10 percent each week. Jot down your plan and increase gradually. Motivation is key| but be careful it doesn’t drive you to bite off more than you can chew.

Train in the right gear: Feeling comfortable during the race| and in training| is crucial to your success. Never race in gear ¡ª especially shoes ¡ª that you haven’t tested before. Run in clothing that is broken in that you know won’t ride up or cause blisters. If you need a new pair of shoes and have time to break them in before race day| go to a running specialty store to get a gait analysis and test the shoes out on a real track. Remember the saying “cotton is rotten” when dressing to train. It makes clothes heavy| sweaty| and wet.

Start strong| finish strong: Positive visualization will help you before the race and during. While you train| picture yourself on the track and tune out any environmental factors. The race will be full of people running right alongside you| so the more you practice this technique| the better your performance will be on the big day. Keep your eyes on the prize as you complete your 5K and keep all of the reasons you decided to do it circling in your head. This will help you feel even more accomplished as you cross the finish line.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography

The 5K Playlist All New Runners Need

If you’ve kicked off a couch-to-5K program, you might be concerned with the speed of your first race. No need to overthink it! For a little motivating music to help you keep time, try out this 12.5-minute-mile playlist that will help you finish the race in just about 40 minutes. Subscribe to the Spotify playlist, then keep reading for the full list of tracks.

    “La La Love You” ¡ª Pixies”Cry When You Get Older” ¡ª Robyn”Wet Hot American Summer” ¡ª Cobra Starship”Kiss You Off” ¡ª Scissor Sisters”Do Your Thing” ¡ª Basement Jaxx”Pharaohs & Pyramids” ¡ª Cut Copy”Hand Me Down Your Love” ¡ª?Hot Chip”The Seed (2.0)” ¡ª The Roots”Great DJ” ¡ª The Ting Tings”And We Danced” ¡ª Macklemore

If this mix doesn’t suit your musical tastes, check out all our workout playlists here.

Remember, you will need to download the free Spotify software or app to listen to our playlists.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography

The 5K Playlist All New Runners Need

If you’ve kicked off a couch-to-5K program| you might be concerned with the speed of your first race. No need to overthink it! For a little motivating music to help you keep time| try out this 12.5-minute-mile playlist that will help you finish the race in just about 40 minutes. Subscribe to the Spotify playlist| then keep reading for the full list of tracks.

    “La La Love You” ¡ª Pixies”Cry When You Get Older” ¡ª Robyn”Wet Hot American Summer” ¡ª Cobra Starship”Kiss You Off” ¡ª Scissor Sisters”Do Your Thing” ¡ª Basement Jaxx”Pharaohs & Pyramids” ¡ª Cut Copy”Hand Me Down Your Love” ¡ª?Hot Chip”The Seed (2.0)” ¡ª The Roots”Great DJ” ¡ª The Ting Tings”And We Danced” ¡ª Macklemore

If this mix doesn’t suit your musical tastes| check out all our workout playlists here.

Remember| you will need to download the free Spotify software or app to listen to our playlists.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography