Paleo Dark Chocolate Bacon Bark

If you’re looking for something sweet and salty to snack on that’s Paleo-friendly, you must try this dark chocolate bacon bark recipe from our friends at PaleoHacks.

Once you try this Paleo Bacon Bark you’ll find that bacon and dark chocolate are a match made in heaven. The dark chocolate is sweet and rich, while the bacon is crisp and salty. The little touch of maple syrup and unrefined sea salt enhances the sweet-salty contrast for an amazing treat!

Plus, the chocolatey recipe is so incredibly easy to make. Just melt the chocolate and sprinkle on the bacon and salt, freeze, and enjoy!

To keep the sugar at a minimum, use a low-sugar bacon and as dark of a chocolate as you like. I used 85 percent cacao, but 90 percent would be delicious as well thanks to the maple syrup that adds sweetness.

For the bacon, we recommend buying pastured bacon at your local meat market; it’s a much better place to find high-quality meats than the grocery store. Get an unrefined salt, pink or gray, for making this Paleo Bacon Bark. They pack more nutrients and offer a fuller flavor.

Since the chocolate is not tempered and does not have additives, it will melt quickly after you’ve made the bacon bark. The simple solution to this is to keep it in the refrigerator in an airtight container. If you like it very crisp, you could even store your Paleo Bacon bark in the freezer (something we love to do with Paleo Peppermint Patties).

Dark Chocolate Bacon Bark

From PaleoHacks

Dark Chocolate Bacon Bark

Dark Chocolate Bacon Bark Recipe

Ingredients

6 slices bacon7 ounces dark chocolate2 tablespoons pure maple syrupUnrefined sea salt

Paleo Dark Chocolate Bacon Bark

If you’re looking for something sweet and salty to snack on that’s Paleo-friendly| you must try this dark chocolate bacon bark recipe from our friends at PaleoHacks.

Once you try this Paleo Bacon Bark you’ll find that bacon and dark chocolate are a match made in heaven. The dark chocolate is sweet and rich| while the bacon is crisp and salty. The little touch of maple syrup and unrefined sea salt enhances the sweet-salty contrast for an amazing treat!

Plus| the chocolatey recipe is so incredibly easy to make. Just melt the chocolate and sprinkle on the bacon and salt| freeze| and enjoy!

To keep the sugar at a minimum| use a low-sugar bacon and as dark of a chocolate as you like. I used 85 percent cacao| but 90 percent would be delicious as well thanks to the maple syrup that adds sweetness.

For the bacon| we recommend buying pastured bacon at your local meat market; it’s a much better place to find high-quality meats than the grocery store. Get an unrefined salt| pink or gray| for making this Paleo Bacon Bark. They pack more nutrients and offer a fuller flavor.

Since the chocolate is not tempered and does not have additives| it will melt quickly after you’ve made the bacon bark. The simple solution to this is to keep it in the refrigerator in an airtight container. If you like it very crisp| you could even store your Paleo Bacon bark in the freezer (something we love to do with Paleo Peppermint Patties).

Dark Chocolate Bacon Bark

From PaleoHacks

Dark Chocolate Bacon Bark

Dark Chocolate Bacon Bark Recipe

Ingredients

6 slices bacon7 ounces dark chocolate2 tablespoons pure maple syrupUnrefined sea salt

Your Paleo Diet May Have a Fatal Side Effect

Bacon-lovers are not going to like this news. World Health Organization (WHO) experts have found that consumption of processed meats can lead to cancer. The International Agency For Research on Cancer (IARC), part of the WHO, has put processed meats like hot dogs and ham in the group 1 list of carcinogens, which includes tobacco, asbestos, and diesel fumes.

The WHO made this decision after convening 22 health experts from around the world, who reviewed 800 studies on meat consumption and cancer. In addition to finding “sufficient evidence” that processed meats cause cancer, the organization classified red meat including beef, lamb, and pork as “probable” carcinogens, putting these meats in the group 2A list, which includes glyphosate, the active ingredient in many weedkillers. Yes, weedkillers! The IARC found links mainly with bowel (colorectal) cancer, but meat consumption was also associated with pancreatic and prostate cancers.

Related: Reasons Not to Eat So Much Red Meat

The IARC cited an estimate that 34,000 cancer deaths per year worldwide are attributed to diets high in processed meat. That’s in contrast to about one million cancer deaths per year due to tobacco smoking, 600,000 a year due to alcohol consumption, and more than 200,000 each year due to air pollution. The WHO said that how much processed meat you consume affects your risk. So how much meat is too much? The experts estimated that eating a daily portion of 50 grams ¡ª the equivalent of just two strips of bacon ¡ª would increase risk by 18 percent. One hamburger patty is 82 grams.

Meat consumption is by far not the only risk factor when it comes to cancer ¡ª smoking, alcohol consumption, body weight, exercise, and genes also play a role. The North American Meat Institute has argued that categorizing meat on the same carcinogenic level as tobacco “defies common sense.” But if eating less processed and red meats can help, then pass the beans and tofu!

Related: Fatty Fish and Other Foods That Help Prevent Breast Cancer

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Anna Monette Roberts

Your Paleo Diet May Have a Fatal Side Effect

Bacon-lovers are not going to like this news. World Health Organization (WHO) experts have found that consumption of processed meats can lead to cancer. The International Agency For Research on Cancer (IARC)| part of the WHO| has put processed meats like hot dogs and ham in the group 1 list of carcinogens| which includes tobacco| asbestos| and diesel fumes.

The WHO made this decision after convening 22 health experts from around the world| who reviewed 800 studies on meat consumption and cancer. In addition to finding “sufficient evidence” that processed meats cause cancer| the organization classified red meat including beef| lamb| and pork as “probable” carcinogens| putting these meats in the group 2A list| which includes glyphosate| the active ingredient in many weedkillers. Yes| weedkillers! The IARC found links mainly with bowel (colorectal) cancer| but meat consumption was also associated with pancreatic and prostate cancers.

Related: Reasons Not to Eat So Much Red Meat

The IARC cited an estimate that 34|000 cancer deaths per year worldwide are attributed to diets high in processed meat. That’s in contrast to about one million cancer deaths per year due to tobacco smoking| 600|000 a year due to alcohol consumption| and more than 200|000 each year due to air pollution. The WHO said that how much processed meat you consume affects your risk. So how much meat is too much? The experts estimated that eating a daily portion of 50 grams ¡ª the equivalent of just two strips of bacon ¡ª would increase risk by 18 percent. One hamburger patty is 82 grams.

Meat consumption is by far not the only risk factor when it comes to cancer ¡ª smoking| alcohol consumption| body weight| exercise| and genes also play a role. The North American Meat Institute has argued that categorizing meat on the same carcinogenic level as tobacco “defies common sense.” But if eating less processed and red meats can help| then pass the beans and tofu!

Related: Fatty Fish and Other Foods That Help Prevent Breast Cancer

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Anna Monette Roberts

Brace Yourself! This Seaweed Is Healthier Than Kale and Tastes Like Bacon

Vegetarians and healthy bacon-lovers rejoice! Our wishes have been granted by researchers at Oregon State University, who’ve created and patented a new seaweed that’s similar in taste to bacon when cooked. As if it couldn’t get any better, this red marine algae is packed with twice the amount of nutrition as kale.

“This strain, which looks like translucent red lettuce, is an excellent source of minerals, vitamins, and antioxidants ¡ª and it contains up to 16 percent protein in dry weight,” Oregon State researcher Chris Langdon said.

The team began to develop the unique strain ¡ª which is similar to the dulse seaweed that grows along the Atlantic and Pacific coastlines ¡ª while creating a food source for abalone, but it seems as though humans would appreciate it much more. Langdon even vouches for its striking flavor resemblance, saying, “This stuff is pretty amazing. When you fry it, which I have done, it tastes like bacon, not seaweed. And it’s a pretty strong bacon flavor.”

The fast-growing superfood will potentially be commercialized in a line of specialty foods. Although plans for outside of science haven’t been confirmed, we can’t wait to get our hands on that gold.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Nicole Perry

Brace Yourself! This Seaweed Is Healthier Than Kale and Tastes Like Bacon

Vegetarians and healthy bacon-lovers rejoice! Our wishes have been granted by researchers at Oregon State University| who’ve created and patented a new seaweed that’s similar in taste to bacon when cooked. As if it couldn’t get any better| this red marine algae is packed with twice the amount of nutrition as kale.

“This strain| which looks like translucent red lettuce| is an excellent source of minerals| vitamins| and antioxidants ¡ª and it contains up to 16 percent protein in dry weight|” Oregon State researcher Chris Langdon said.

The team began to develop the unique strain ¡ª which is similar to the dulse seaweed that grows along the Atlantic and Pacific coastlines ¡ª while creating a food source for abalone| but it seems as though humans would appreciate it much more. Langdon even vouches for its striking flavor resemblance| saying| “This stuff is pretty amazing. When you fry it| which I have done| it tastes like bacon| not seaweed. And it’s a pretty strong bacon flavor.”

The fast-growing superfood will potentially be commercialized in a line of specialty foods. Although plans for outside of science haven’t been confirmed| we can’t wait to get our hands on that gold.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Nicole Perry