4 Tips to Prevent Exercise Acne

The following post was originally featured on Fit Bottomed Girls and written by Susan, who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

If there’s one thing I definitely don’t miss about my adolescence, it’s acne.

(Also up there? Not having a CLUE how to grow my bangs out, general social awkwardness and feeling totally weird in my body. But that’s for another post.)

And while I’m happy that the majority of my adolescent acne woes are behind me, I still get the occasional annoying breakout ¡ª some of it is hormonal, I know, but others fall squarely in the exercise acne camp.

And it’s no fun! You go to the gym to feel better inside and out ¡ª not break out! Which is why we wanted to share these tips how to prevent exercise acne from New York Dermatologist, Dr. Jeremy Fenton of the Schweiger Dermatology Group, for Be-YOU-tiful Week.

How to Prevent Exercise Acne

Nothing feels better than a good sweat session. Working out isn’t always as good for your skin as it is for your health. A build-up of sweat can clog pores and lead to breakouts. Not to mention, touching your face transfers oil and bacteria (which thrive in moist, humid environments like the gym) to the skin, leading to possible acne flare-ups. Here are four easy ways to prevent exercise acne each time you hit the gym.

    Don’t postpone showering. Showering soon after a workout will prevent sweat from sticking around and mixing with dead skin cells to clog pores. If you don’t have time or access to a shower right after your workout, you can use a medicated pad with salicylic or glycolic acid (such as Clear Clinic ClearMe Pads) for a quick wipe-down to prevent exercise acne.Use the right body wash. Trading out your regular soap for an antibacterial or anti-acne wash containing ingredients such as benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid can also be helpful at preventing exercise acne. One tip for using a benzoyl peroxide wash is to leave it on for a few minutes after you lather (shave or brush your teeth in the shower) before rinsing it off. This can help the medication sink in. There are also micronized forms of benzoyl peroxide on the market now that have smaller sized particles of the medication, allowing for deeper penetration into the pores and follicles. Exfoliate regularly. Regular exfoliation is the key to preventing the buildup of skin cells: exfoliating scrubs, body brushes or just a washcloth can make a big difference.Breathable clothing. Try to wear loose-fitting, breathable cotton clothing. The tighter, synthetic materials just compress the sweat and dirt into the pores.

Do you know notice exercise acne flare-ups when you don’t do these things? I’ve found it’s a little bit better for me in the winter than the summer just because I sweat less and there’s less humidity in the cooler months, but number 3 is so key for me!

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / THEM TOO

4 Tips to Prevent Exercise Acne

The following post was originally featured on Fit Bottomed Girls and written by Susan| who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

If there’s one thing I definitely don’t miss about my adolescence| it’s acne.

(Also up there? Not having a CLUE how to grow my bangs out| general social awkwardness and feeling totally weird in my body. But that’s for another post.)

And while I’m happy that the majority of my adolescent acne woes are behind me| I still get the occasional annoying breakout some of it is hormonal| I know| but others fall squarely in the exercise acne camp.

And it’s no fun! You go to the gym to feel better inside and out not break out! Which is why we wanted to share these tips how to prevent exercise acne from New York Dermatologist| Dr. Jeremy Fenton of the Schweiger Dermatology Group| for Be-YOU-tiful Week.

How to Prevent Exercise Acne

Nothing feels better than a good sweat session. Working out isn’t always as good for your skin as it is for your health. A build-up of sweat can clog pores and lead to breakouts. Not to mention| touching your face transfers oil and bacteria (which thrive in moist| humid environments like the gym) to the skin| leading to possible acne flare-ups. Here are four easy ways to prevent exercise acne each time you hit the gym.

    Don’t postpone showering. Showering soon after a workout will prevent sweat from sticking around and mixing with dead skin cells to clog pores. If you don’t have time or access to a shower right after your workout| you can use a medicated pad with salicylic or glycolic acid (such as Clear Clinic ClearMe Pads) for a quick wipe-down to prevent exercise acne.Use the right body wash. Trading out your regular soap for an antibacterial or anti-acne wash containing ingredients such as benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid can also be helpful at preventing exercise acne. One tip for using a benzoyl peroxide wash is to leave it on for a few minutes after you lather (shave or brush your teeth in the shower) before rinsing it off. This can help the medication sink in. There are also micronized forms of benzoyl peroxide on the market now that have smaller sized particles of the medication| allowing for deeper penetration into the pores and follicles. Exfoliate regularly. Regular exfoliation is the key to preventing the buildup of skin cells: exfoliating scrubs| body brushes or just a washcloth can make a big difference.Breathable clothing. Try to wear loose-fitting| breathable cotton clothing. The tighter| synthetic materials just compress the sweat and dirt into the pores.

Do you know notice exercise acne flare-ups when you don’t do these things? I’ve found it’s a little bit better for me in the winter than the summer just because I sweat less and there’s less humidity in the cooler months| but number 3 is so key for me!

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / THEM TOO

Getting a Breast Reduction Rescued My Self-Esteem – and My Love Life

Our friends at YourTango share how a breast reduction improved one woman’s life for the better.

Finally, at 24, my confidence has gone through puberty. Weeks before I turned 19, I checked into Massachusetts General Hospital terrified that nothing could fix the way I saw myself. Two days after undergoing surgery, I stood topless in my parents’ bathroom watching as my mother slowly pulled squares of medical tape spotted with pus and dried blood from my chest. I waited in Percocet-induced suspense for my flat-chested doppelganger to miraculously appear in the full-length mirror.

When they were finally uncovered, I hardly recognized the small puffy breasts that fit perfectly inside the palms of my hands. There were lines of stitches in rows around my nipples and a mixture of yellow and purple tie-dyed bruises.

“Much better,” my mother smiled at me.

“Really?” I asked.

“Yes,” she responded confidently placing her delicate hands on my bare shoulders. “I forgot how tiny you are.”

Immediately after surgery, my mother saw me differently; everyone did, except for me.

I had assumed that once I got rid of my boobs I’d instantly feel small and confident. But enduring surgery, permanent scarring, and a 40 percent chance I’ll not be able to breast feed, it turns out, were easy compared with the process of shaking off my old insecurities.

As a kid, my ballet teacher nicknamed me Olive Oil because I was tall and skinny with long dark hair like the cartoon. By 14, puberty had left me squeezing into 32DD bras. My instant curves disgusted me.

“You are not fat; you’re Zaftik,” my mother would say in Yiddish, as she inspected my 5’7″ and 120-lb. frame. She meant I carried my weight well. Large busts were so common among Jewish women they’d created a word in the Old Country for exactly what I’d inherited. I was perceived as a sensual Marilyn Monroe-type, but I felt completely unsexy. I was physically uncomfortable, weighed down by my top-heavy frame, and unable to find shirts that didn’t draw attention to my unavoidable cleavage. I sported high-necked collars hoping to distract people from noticing that my boobs were larger than my head. I layered sports bras and applied duct tape around my chest a la Christina Ricci’s character in Now and Then. Surrounded by flat-chested blondes at my New England boarding school, it was impossible for me to blend in. The constant attention and not-so-subtle jokes using my last name, Gerber, a popular brand of baby food, fueled my insecurity. I dreamed of wearing Lacoste sun dresses over 32B wireless cotton bras. I went on boob-shrinking, no-carb fasts during cross country season, but starvation didn’t alter my breast size. Instead it left painful and visible stress fractures in my emaciated legs.

My enormous chest dictated more than just my anxious behavior, it controlled my relationships.

My most significant romance was with an on-again-off-again long-distance boyfriend. During our infrequent visits, we’d kiss fully clothed. I can remember stopping his hand as he gently tried to slide it up my shirt. I could hardly stand to take off my bra in the shower, much less in front of another person. Although I was terrified of anyone picking up on my shrinking self-esteem, I feared falling too far behind my friends in high school who were already starting to have sex. When I lost my virginity, I was almost completely dressed wearing a skirt and long sleeve shirt. I’d just turned 18 and had ditched my latest boyfriend for a blond hockey player who was too shy to pull at my top. I didn’t tell him it was my first time. I felt comfortable knowing we weren’t dating and he wouldn’t have time to realize how miserable I was with my body. As I quietly searched for my heels in the morning darkness ¡ª looking to escape without waking him ¡ª I realized that protecting myself from criticism meant avoiding intimacy altogether.

After a family friend with breasts smaller than mine decided to go under the knife, I became convinced a nip-tuck would be a quick fix to my growing relationship problems and my distorted body image.

I called my surgeon father in hysterics and begged him to help me.

“Your daughter wants a breast reduction. Who do I know at the Mass General?” I heard him say to my mother before hanging up the phone. I had a doctor’s appointment the next day.

I had assumed that once I got rid of my breasts, I’d instantly feel small and confident. Rather than alleviate my insecurities, the surgery brought them closer to the surface.

Although most people assumed I’d lost weight and couldn’t exactly put it together, I now had physical scars from the reduction ¡ª thin lines running up, down and around my chest that turned bright red when I drank alcohol.

The first guy I kissed post-op was a sweet prep-school graduate. He didn’t know me before and I loved the way I looked to him. I felt like I was in seventh grade again ¡ª excited by my new breasts, but terrified to show anyone. When we eventually went back to his dorm room, nothing sounded less sexy than admitting, “I had plastic surgery,” mid-hookup. I awkwardly insisted he turn the lights off, still too distrusting to let another person see my body.

It’s been five years since my surgery. Finally, at 24, my confidence has gone through puberty. Heads don’t turn on cue the way they used to; when guys do check me out, I’m relieved to see them look me up and down instead of gawk at my breasts. I’m now in a long-term relationship, where I’m not constantly aware of my breasts and, more importantly, I’ve become comfortable enough in my own skin to achieve real intimacy.

A few months ago, I saw a new gynecologist. During the breast exam she asked me how long it had been since my reduction. I looked at her confused and unsure of how she could tell. To me the scars have faded entirely, and that girl with the duct tape and sports bras, who tried desperately to hide her body, has disappeared.

More from YourTango:

Guys Review 8 Different Types of Vaginas (Yes, Really)A Guide to the BEST Birth Control For Every Type of Woman Out There10 Inspirational Quotes About Change to Get You Out of Your SlumpImage Source: ShopStyle Photography

Getting a Breast Reduction Rescued My Self-Esteem – and My Love Life

Our friends at YourTango share how a breast reduction improved one woman’s life for the better.

Finally| at 24| my confidence has gone through puberty. Weeks before I turned 19| I checked into Massachusetts General Hospital terrified that nothing could fix the way I saw myself. Two days after undergoing surgery| I stood topless in my parents’ bathroom watching as my mother slowly pulled squares of medical tape spotted with pus and dried blood from my chest. I waited in Percocet-induced suspense for my flat-chested doppelganger to miraculously appear in the full-length mirror.

When they were finally uncovered| I hardly recognized the small puffy breasts that fit perfectly inside the palms of my hands. There were lines of stitches in rows around my nipples and a mixture of yellow and purple tie-dyed bruises.

“Much better|” my mother smiled at me.

“Really?” I asked.

“Yes|” she responded confidently placing her delicate hands on my bare shoulders. “I forgot how tiny you are.”

Immediately after surgery| my mother saw me differently; everyone did| except for me.

I had assumed that once I got rid of my boobs I’d instantly feel small and confident. But enduring surgery| permanent scarring| and a 40 percent chance I’ll not be able to breast feed| it turns out| were easy compared with the process of shaking off my old insecurities.

As a kid| my ballet teacher nicknamed me Olive Oil because I was tall and skinny with long dark hair like the cartoon. By 14| puberty had left me squeezing into 32DD bras. My instant curves disgusted me.

“You are not fat; you’re Zaftik|” my mother would say in Yiddish| as she inspected my 5’7″ and 120-lb. frame. She meant I carried my weight well. Large busts were so common among Jewish women they’d created a word in the Old Country for exactly what I’d inherited. I was perceived as a sensual Marilyn Monroe-type| but I felt completely unsexy. I was physically uncomfortable| weighed down by my top-heavy frame| and unable to find shirts that didn’t draw attention to my unavoidable cleavage. I sported high-necked collars hoping to distract people from noticing that my boobs were larger than my head. I layered sports bras and applied duct tape around my chest a la Christina Ricci’s character in Now and Then. Surrounded by flat-chested blondes at my New England boarding school| it was impossible for me to blend in. The constant attention and not-so-subtle jokes using my last name| Gerber| a popular brand of baby food| fueled my insecurity. I dreamed of wearing Lacoste sun dresses over 32B wireless cotton bras. I went on boob-shrinking| no-carb fasts during cross country season| but starvation didn’t alter my breast size. Instead it left painful and visible stress fractures in my emaciated legs.

My enormous chest dictated more than just my anxious behavior| it controlled my relationships.

My most significant romance was with an on-again-off-again long-distance boyfriend. During our infrequent visits| we’d kiss fully clothed. I can remember stopping his hand as he gently tried to slide it up my shirt. I could hardly stand to take off my bra in the shower| much less in front of another person. Although I was terrified of anyone picking up on my shrinking self-esteem| I feared falling too far behind my friends in high school who were already starting to have sex. When I lost my virginity| I was almost completely dressed wearing a skirt and long sleeve shirt. I’d just turned 18 and had ditched my latest boyfriend for a blond hockey player who was too shy to pull at my top. I didn’t tell him it was my first time. I felt comfortable knowing we weren’t dating and he wouldn’t have time to realize how miserable I was with my body. As I quietly searched for my heels in the morning darkness ¡ª looking to escape without waking him ¡ª I realized that protecting myself from criticism meant avoiding intimacy altogether.

After a family friend with breasts smaller than mine decided to go under the knife| I became convinced a nip-tuck would be a quick fix to my growing relationship problems and my distorted body image.

I called my surgeon father in hysterics and begged him to help me.

“Your daughter wants a breast reduction. Who do I know at the Mass General?” I heard him say to my mother before hanging up the phone. I had a doctor’s appointment the next day.

I had assumed that once I got rid of my breasts| I’d instantly feel small and confident. Rather than alleviate my insecurities| the surgery brought them closer to the surface.

Although most people assumed I’d lost weight and couldn’t exactly put it together| I now had physical scars from the reduction ¡ª thin lines running up| down and around my chest that turned bright red when I drank alcohol.

The first guy I kissed post-op was a sweet prep-school graduate. He didn’t know me before and I loved the way I looked to him. I felt like I was in seventh grade again ¡ª excited by my new breasts| but terrified to show anyone. When we eventually went back to his dorm room| nothing sounded less sexy than admitting| “I had plastic surgery|” mid-hookup. I awkwardly insisted he turn the lights off| still too distrusting to let another person see my body.

It’s been five years since my surgery. Finally| at 24| my confidence has gone through puberty. Heads don’t turn on cue the way they used to; when guys do check me out| I’m relieved to see them look me up and down instead of gawk at my breasts. I’m now in a long-term relationship| where I’m not constantly aware of my breasts and| more importantly| I’ve become comfortable enough in my own skin to achieve real intimacy.

A few months ago| I saw a new gynecologist. During the breast exam she asked me how long it had been since my reduction. I looked at her confused and unsure of how she could tell. To me the scars have faded entirely| and that girl with the duct tape and sports bras| who tried desperately to hide her body| has disappeared.

More from YourTango:

Guys Review 8 Different Types of Vaginas (Yes| Really)A Guide to the BEST Birth Control For Every Type of Woman Out There10 Inspirational Quotes About Change to Get You Out of Your SlumpImage Source: ShopStyle Photography

8 Foods You Should Be Eating For a Youthful Glow

8 Foods You Should Be Eating For a Youthful Glow

It’s easy for skin to become dry| flaky| and sallow during colder months. Before you go out and spend your paycheck on fancy lotions and creams| try nourishing your skin from the inside out u2014u00a0what we put in our bodies is just as essential to a healthy glow as what we put on it. Here are eight foods that will leave you glowing all year long!

| Get That Youthful Glow

If you’re not getting enough vitamin A in your diet| then your skin is majorly suffering. Not enough of this nutrient makes skin healthy kale recipes.

| Repair and Rejuvenate

Foods like oysters| crab| and lean meats are rich in zinc| which makes them great skin soothers. Zinc helps reduce oil production and acne and also helps heal wounds.

| What Wrinkles?

By now we all know that citrus fruits like oranges and grapefruit are chock-full of vitamin C| which is great for protecting against immune deficiencies like colds. But this essential nutrient also helps turn back the clock byFoods That Improve Dry Skin

| Protect and Heal

Green tea is an all-around healer to skin. It helps protect the skin from melanoma and acts as an anti-inflammatory against acne and cuts.

| Smooth It Out

You probably already know that sulfur masks are great to put on the skin| but sulfur-rich foods such as eggs and garlic help the skin from the inside out. Sulfur helps keep nutritional benefits that make them a mainstay in our diets.

Related: Are Egg Whites Healthier Than Whole Eggs?

| Nature’s Sunblock

Bring on the red sauce! Eating tomatoes can actually help block out the sun’s harmful UV rays. This is a good thing since sun damage can cause premature aging and skin cancer.

| Build a Force Field

As if we need an excuse to eat more berries u2014 they’re great on their own or as a topping for salads| cereal| and yogurt. Full of antioxidants| berries protect the skin from free radicals| which disrupt healthy cell production| causing you to look older faster.

| Soft and Supple

Fish like salmon| tuna| and trout are high in omega-3s. Those good-for-you fats help soften dry skin by holding in moisture| which helps decrease the look of wrinkles and plumps up skin.

The Best Eleven braid tutorials

Braiding is no longer for young girls on the playground. From Boho chic braids to wedding waterfall braids, these meticulously twisted hairstyles are beautiful at any age and it looks like this style is here to stay for awhile! Ready to learn how to braid your tresses or expand your braiding abilities? Here are The 11 Best Braid tutorials to help you get started.

11 How to do a Fishtail Braid Click to See It Total Beauty
10 How to do a Bohemian Side Braid Click to See It The Freckled Fox
9 How to do a Half-up Half-down Braid Idea for Short Hair Click to See It The Small Things Blog
8 How to do a Half-up Half-down Boho Braid Click to See It Missy Sue