6 Male Celebrities Who Were Diagnosed With Breast Cancer

6 Male Celebrities Who Were Diagnosed With Breast Cancer

While most people associate breast cancer with women| the opposite sex is certainly not immune to the disease. Our friends at Men’s Health have a list of famous men who have all been diagnosed with breast cancer.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month| and while the vast majority of those diagnosed with breast cancer are female| it can also be a health risk for guys.

About 1% of breast cancer diagnoses are men| which may not seem like a lot| but it amounts to about 2|000 men every year and approximately 440 deaths.

Just like women| it’s important for men to also check regularly for a mass in their chests. As with all cancers| early detection is key. (Find out Why Some People Ignore Their Cancer Symptoms.)

For further proof that male breast cancer isn’t all that uncommon| here are 6 famous guys| from actors to rock stars to politicians| who were diagnosed with (and sometimes beat) breast cancer.

| Richard Roundtree

The actor best known for playing the eponymous role in 1971’s Shaft u2014 the black private dick that’s a sex machine to all the chicks u2014 was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1993.

“”I thought he was questioning my manhood|”” he wrote in an essay for Essence in 2009| sharing the day his doctor first told him he had breast cancer. “”Women die from this| not men. How could I possibly have that?””

Did He Survive? Yes. After a double mastectomy and chemotherapy.

| Rod Roddy

The iconic game show announcer| whose jovial voice greeted contestants to “”Come on down!”” for 17 years on The Price is Right| suffered from both colon cancer and male breast cancer.

Did He Survive? No. After a mastectomy in 2002| he lost his battle the following year.

| Edward Brooke

In 1966| Edward Brooke became the first African-American elected to the Senate. In September of 2002| Brooke was diagnosed with breast cancer.

He originally assumed that the pain he was feeling| just under his right nipple| was a pulled muscle from gardening.

Did He Survive? Yes. He underwent a double mastectomy| and remained cancer free until his death in January 2015 at age 95.

| Peter Criss

“”You don’t need boobs to get breast cancer|”” the KISS drummer told Fox News in 2014.

The legendary musician| who was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2014 (along with the rest of KISS)| found a lump in his left breast after a workout in 2007.

Did He Survive? Yes. Since his successful surgery| Criss has been an outspoken advocate for male breast cancer awareness.

| Ernie Green

Ernie Green| a fullback with the Cleveland Browns from 1962 to 1968| discovered a lump in his chest in 2005| but was told not to worry by a doctor| due to the rarity of male breast cancer.

Green got a second opinion| and a mammogram and biopsy revealed that it was indeed cancer.

Did He Survive? Yes. He received a mastectomy| as well as eight sessions of chemotherapy| and he has been cancer-free since 2006.

| Montel Williams

In 2012| talk show host and television personality Montel Williams appeared on the Dr. Oz show to talk about his emotional eating| which began after a very traumatic event when he was 19.

While serving as a U.S. Marine| he was diagnosed with breast cancer and received a double mastectomy. Only later was it discovered that he simply had a torn pectoral muscle and the entire surgery was completely unnecessary.

Did He Survive? Yes. And despite being “”butchered”” by his surgeons (his word)| he re-discovered his self-esteem with weightlifting.

u2014 Brian Vanhooker

Check out more great stories from Men’s Health:

Large Study Confirms This Worrisome Link Between Alcohol and Breast Cancer

It’s true that alcohol in moderation can be good for your health, but weighing the pros and cons of your daily glass of wine is always a good idea. A new, large European study reinforces this idea by confirming that every glass of alcohol you drink increases your risk of breast cancer.

Related: Foods That Prevent Breast Cancer

In the study, published in the International Journal of Cancer, researchers followed the habits of more than 334,000 women aged 35 to 70 for 11 years and found that alcohol consumption was a determining risk factor for developing breast cancer. In fact, they calculate that while drinking a glass a day increases the risk by one percent, drinking two glasses of wine or beer a day increases your risk of breast cancer by four percent. In other words, with each drink, you’re quadrupling your risk of breast cancer. The scientists also found that long-term exposure to alcohol was also a risk factor, meaning that the longer you’ve been an alcohol drinker, the higher your risk of developing breast cancer.

Limiting alcohol intake has long been recommended by health organizations as a way to prevent diseases like cancer ¡ª in fact, one study from 2007 found that drinking three glasses of any type of alcohol a day increases your risk of breast cancer by 30 percent ¡ª but this large study is just one more big confirmation that habits like alcohol intake can have a direct and lasting impact on your health. Read more of our tips on how women of any age can reduce their risk of breast cancer here.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / THEM TOO

Large Study Confirms This Worrisome Link Between Alcohol and Breast Cancer

It’s true that alcohol in moderation can be good for your health| but weighing the pros and cons of your daily glass of wine is always a good idea. A new| large European study reinforces this idea by confirming that every glass of alcohol you drink increases your risk of breast cancer.

Related: Foods That Prevent Breast Cancer

In the study| published in the International Journal of Cancer| researchers followed the habits of more than 334|000 women aged 35 to 70 for 11 years and found that alcohol consumption was a determining risk factor for developing breast cancer. In fact| they calculate that while drinking a glass a day increases the risk by one percent| drinking two glasses of wine or beer a day increases your risk of breast cancer by four percent. In other words| with each drink| you’re quadrupling your risk of breast cancer. The scientists also found that long-term exposure to alcohol was also a risk factor| meaning that the longer you’ve been an alcohol drinker| the higher your risk of developing breast cancer.

Limiting alcohol intake has long been recommended by health organizations as a way to prevent diseases like cancer ¡ª in fact| one study from 2007 found that drinking three glasses of any type of alcohol a day increases your risk of breast cancer by 30 percent ¡ª but this large study is just one more big confirmation that habits like alcohol intake can have a direct and lasting impact on your health. Read more of our tips on how women of any age can reduce their risk of breast cancer here.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / THEM TOO

This Must-Read News Will Drastically Affect Breast Cancer Screenings

If you’re a woman (or somebody who loves a woman), then listen up: this news is for you. The American Cancer Society, which has long been the authority on preventive screening protocols, has officially changed its guidelines regarding mammograms. In a move quite contrary to the ACS’s former recommendations ¡ª which urged women to begin annual testing at age 40 ¡ª the institution now says that women with no predisposition for breast cancer begin exams later and less frequently. According to the new recommendations, 45-year-old women at an average risk for breast cancer should start annual mammograms until age 54, when they can reduce testing frequency to every other year.

Another big change to the ACS guidelines regards clinical breast examinations, which your doctor usually performs during your gynecological exam: instead of the previously recommended annual exams, the society now says that women of average risk no longer need the tests at all. However, the American Cancer Society emphasizes that these new guidelines are “recommendations,” allowing women to choose whichever route of breast cancer screening they feel most comfortable with. So to make an informed decision about your health, be sure to read the ACS’s full statement for all the details, and always stay educated about ways that you can reduce your risk for breast cancer.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Ericka McConnell

This Must-Read News Will Drastically Affect Breast Cancer Screenings

If you’re a woman (or somebody who loves a woman)| then listen up: this news is for you. The American Cancer Society| which has long been the authority on preventive screening protocols| has officially changed its guidelines regarding mammograms. In a move quite contrary to the ACS’s former recommendations ¡ª which urged women to begin annual testing at age 40 ¡ª the institution now says that women with no predisposition for breast cancer begin exams later and less frequently. According to the new recommendations| 45-year-old women at an average risk for breast cancer should start annual mammograms until age 54| when they can reduce testing frequency to every other year.

Another big change to the ACS guidelines regards clinical breast examinations| which your doctor usually performs during your gynecological exam: instead of the previously recommended annual exams| the society now says that women of average risk no longer need the tests at all. However| the American Cancer Society emphasizes that these new guidelines are “recommendations|” allowing women to choose whichever route of breast cancer screening they feel most comfortable with. So to make an informed decision about your health| be sure to read the ACS’s full statement for all the details| and always stay educated about ways that you can reduce your risk for breast cancer.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Ericka McConnell

10 Things Every Woman Should Do to Prevent Breast Cancer

There are several risk factors that can increase your chances of developing breast cancer. And while the risk increases as we age, there are certain preventative measures every women should do, whether she’s in her 20s or in her mammogram years, to help reduce her risk of getting the disease. Read on for 10 things every women should do to help prevent breast cancer.

    Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight or obese has been shown to be a risk factor in developing certain types of breast cancer.Check up on your family history. How many people in your family have had breast cancer? If you don’t know, now’s the time to check. Having close family members who developed breast cancer increases your risk as well since certain risk factors are genetic.Don’t be a stranger to your girls. Self breast exams may not have been given a ringing endorsement from the medical community, but you should still be familiar with how your breasts feel and look so you’ll notice any changes.Drink in moderation. While that glass of red is good for you, excessive alcohol drinking has been linked to an increased risk of cancer. Stick to a one-a-day mantra if you want to reduce your risk.Keep exercising. Not only will working out help you maintain a healthy weight, exercising itself has been shown to reduce your risk of developing cancer. The American Cancer Society notes that as little as 1.5 to 2.5 hours of walking a week has been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer. Make it your mission to walk or exercise for at least 30 minutes a day, five times a week.Support the cause. Everyone goes pink for the month of October, so pick a trustworthy organization and show your support. By donating time or money or dropping a few bucks on a cute product for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, you’ll be supporting breast cancer research that will help millions.Know the facts about birth control. Taking oral contraceptives is one risk factor for developing breast cancer, but the risk decreases to normal levels the longer you are off them (women who took birth control pills more than 10 years ago, for example, have the same risks as women who never took the pill). Weigh the pros and cons of taking birth control and talk to your doctor if you want to know more.Assess your risk. It always helps to be informed. Know all the risks of breast cancer ¡ª even ones that can’t always be avoided, like starting your period at an early age, having a child after 35, or never breastfeeding ¡ª so you know what choices you have. Check the National Cancer Institute or The American Cancer Society for comprehensive lists of lifestyle, genetic, and environment risk factors.Don’t be shy at the doctor’s. Your doctor isn’t just there to admonish you when you admit you have a sugar addiction, she’s also there to make sure you are knowledgeable about why and how lifestyle choices affect your health. Make sure you ask questions about anything that’s unclear to you.Relax. Just because you have certain risk factors for developing the disease doesn’t mean you’ll get breast cancer, or that you should spend your life worrying about getting it. After all, the biggest risk factors for getting breast cancer ¡ª being female and aging ¡ª aren’t exactly something you can change. Instead of worrying, just do what you can to live a healthy lifestyle ¡ª you’ll not only reduce your risk, but will also feel better overall.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Matthew Barnes

10 Things Every Woman Should Do to Prevent Breast Cancer

There are several risk factors that can increase your chances of developing breast cancer. And while the risk increases as we age| there are certain preventative measures every women should do| whether she’s in her 20s or in her mammogram years| to help reduce her risk of getting the disease. Read on for 10 things every women should do to help prevent breast cancer.

    Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight or obese has been shown to be a risk factor in developing certain types of breast cancer.Check up on your family history. How many people in your family have had breast cancer? If you don’t know| now’s the time to check. Having close family members who developed breast cancer increases your risk as well since certain risk factors are genetic.Don’t be a stranger to your girls. Self breast exams may not have been given a ringing endorsement from the medical community| but you should still be familiar with how your breasts feel and look so you’ll notice any changes.Drink in moderation. While that glass of red is good for you| excessive alcohol drinking has been linked to an increased risk of cancer. Stick to a one-a-day mantra if you want to reduce your risk.Keep exercising. Not only will working out help you maintain a healthy weight| exercising itself has been shown to reduce your risk of developing cancer. The American Cancer Society notes that as little as 1.5 to 2.5 hours of walking a week has been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer. Make it your mission to walk or exercise for at least 30 minutes a day| five times a week.Support the cause. Everyone goes pink for the month of October| so pick a trustworthy organization and show your support. By donating time or money or dropping a few bucks on a cute product for Breast Cancer Awareness Month| you’ll be supporting breast cancer research that will help millions.Know the facts about birth control. Taking oral contraceptives is one risk factor for developing breast cancer| but the risk decreases to normal levels the longer you are off them (women who took birth control pills more than 10 years ago| for example| have the same risks as women who never took the pill). Weigh the pros and cons of taking birth control and talk to your doctor if you want to know more.Assess your risk. It always helps to be informed. Know all the risks of breast cancer even ones that can’t always be avoided| like starting your period at an early age| having a child after 35| or never breastfeeding so you know what choices you have. Check the National Cancer Institute or The American Cancer Society for comprehensive lists of lifestyle| genetic| and environment risk factors.Don’t be shy at the doctor’s. Your doctor isn’t just there to admonish you when you admit you have a sugar addiction| she’s also there to make sure you are knowledgeable about why and how lifestyle choices affect your health. Make sure you ask questions about anything that’s unclear to you.Relax. Just because you have certain risk factors for developing the disease doesn’t mean you’ll get breast cancer| or that you should spend your life worrying about getting it. After all| the biggest risk factors for getting breast cancer being female and aging aren’t exactly something you can change. Instead of worrying| just do what you can to live a healthy lifestyle you’ll not only reduce your risk| but will also feel better overall.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Matthew Barnes

This Organization Helps Breast Cancer Survivors Heal in the Most Badass Way Possible

This Organization Helps Breast Cancer Survivors Heal in the Most Badass Way Possible

If you or a loved one has ever been affected by breast cancer, 15 Mastectomy Tattoos That Celebrate Scars in a Beautiful Way

This Organization Helps Breast Cancer Survivors Heal in the Most Badass Way Possible

This Organization Helps Breast Cancer Survivors Heal in the Most Badass Way Possible

If you or a loved one has ever been affected by breast cancer| 15 Mastectomy Tattoos That Celebrate Scars in a Beautiful Way

Shannen Doherty Opens Up About Her Battle With Breast Cancer

If you were alive in the ’90s, you knew Shannen Doherty from TV classics Beverly Hills, 90210 and Charmed. But the star sadly revealed in an exclusive statement to People that she’s now fighting breast cancer.

The 44-year-old actress is currently undergoing treatment and looking to fitness and loved ones to help her through. “I am continuing to eat right, exercise, and stay very positive about my life,” said Doherty. “I am thankful to my family, friends, and doctors for their support, and, of course, my fans who have stood by me.”

Doherty was first diagnosed in March 2015, but only recently came out due to exposed legal documents on TMZ that revealed a lawsuit against her former business manager. The lawsuit found him responsible for the period Doherty was medically uninsured because of neglecting insurance payments. Had her finances been properly settled, it’s possible that the cancer could have been kept from spreading when it did in 2014.

Just because we never know when or if it might happen to us does not mean we shouldn’t be aware of changes in our body. Knowing the right foods to help prevent breast cancer and actively taking preventative measures can go a long way toward staying protected. Don’t wait until you’re given a reason to care.

Image Source: Getty / Michael Tran