Get Energized With This Pumpkin Buckwheat Power Bowl

The following post was originally featured on Eating Bird Food and written by Brittany Mullins, who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

Love oatmeal but want to switch it up? I’ve got a lovely, Fall-inspired buckwheat porridge recipe for you!

Despite what its name would lead you to believe, buckwheat doesn’t contain any wheat, and it’s actually not even a real grain. It’s a pseudograin (the same as quinoa), so it’s naturally wheat and gluten free. It’s also higher in protein than wheat, corn, rice, and millet!

I recently went through our pantry and found that I had stockpiled a ton of bulk-bin items, one of which was buckwheat groats. I posted about it on Instagram, and apparently I’m not the only food hoarder out there. That made me feel a tiny bit better, but I still think my collection is a bit ridiculous, so I’m on a mission to use them all up before buying any more.

Not really sure what I was going to do with the buckwheat, I decided to soak and sprout them. I’ve only tried sprouting a few times, but it really isn’t hard, and it was so fun to watch the little sprouts form. Maybe I’m just crazy, but I love watching stuff grow, sprout, etc. It’s like magic!

You do have to have a little patience because it does take a couple days to get your sprouts. Usually I’m the most inpatient person I know, but the sprouting worked to my advantage, because by the time the groats had finished soaking/sprouting, I had come up with a recipe idea.

I used sprouted buckwheat groats in the recipe because I had the extra time and there are many benefits of sprouting. If you want to sprout yours, here’s a great guide I found.

That said, if you don’t have the time for sprouting, just be sure you soak and rinse the buckwheat groats, as it makes them easier to digest, and the nutrients more readily absorbed in your body. After soaking, the groats may be a little slimy ¡ª that’s perfectly normal: just rinse them and use them according to the recipe.

So for this buckwheat power bowl, I cooked it up the same way I cook stove-top oats. I used unsweetened vanilla almond milk and banana slices for a hint of sweetness and then added the canned pumpkin and pumpkin spice seasoning for a little taste of Fall. The buckwheat gives the bowl a distinct nutty flavor and a lovely boost of volume and creaminess.

To give it a powerful nutrient boost (and make it pretty), I topped the bowl with chia seeds, dried apple slices, cranberries, and pecans.

Time to dig in!

I think this bowl is perfectly sweet on its own, especially with a little dried fruit on top, but feel free to sprinkle on a little coconut sugar or a drizzle of maple syrup if you need it to be sweeter. I enjoyed the first serving warm, well, semiwarm, since I had to take photos of it (blogger problems!). I ate the second serving for breakfast this morning cold, straight from the fridge like overnight oats. It was delicious both ways!

Pumpkin Buckwheat Porridge Power Bowl

Eating Bird Food

Pumpkin Buckwheat Porridge Power Bowl

Notes

If you¡¯re new to buckwheat groats, look for the raw version, not the toasted version, which is often called kasha. You¡¯ll likely find it at your local health food store in the bulk-bin section or in the grain aisle.

Serving size: 1 bowl without toppings | Calories: 245 | Fat: 3 | Carbohydrates: 50 | Sugar: 10 | Fiber: 9 | Protein: 7

Get Energized With This Pumpkin Buckwheat Power Bowl

The following post was originally featured on Eating Bird Food and written by Brittany Mullins| who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

Love oatmeal but want to switch it up? I’ve got a lovely| Fall-inspired buckwheat porridge recipe for you!

Despite what its name would lead you to believe| buckwheat doesn’t contain any wheat| and it’s actually not even a real grain. It’s a pseudograin (the same as quinoa)| so it’s naturally wheat and gluten free. It’s also higher in protein than wheat| corn| rice| and millet!

I recently went through our pantry and found that I had stockpiled a ton of bulk-bin items| one of which was buckwheat groats. I posted about it on Instagram| and apparently I’m not the only food hoarder out there. That made me feel a tiny bit better| but I still think my collection is a bit ridiculous| so I’m on a mission to use them all up before buying any more.

Not really sure what I was going to do with the buckwheat| I decided to soak and sprout them. I’ve only tried sprouting a few times| but it really isn’t hard| and it was so fun to watch the little sprouts form. Maybe I’m just crazy| but I love watching stuff grow| sprout| etc. It’s like magic!

You do have to have a little patience because it does take a couple days to get your sprouts. Usually I’m the most inpatient person I know| but the sprouting worked to my advantage| because by the time the groats had finished soaking/sprouting| I had come up with a recipe idea.

I used sprouted buckwheat groats in the recipe because I had the extra time and there are many benefits of sprouting. If you want to sprout yours| here’s a great guide I found.

That said| if you don’t have the time for sprouting| just be sure you soak and rinse the buckwheat groats| as it makes them easier to digest| and the nutrients more readily absorbed in your body. After soaking| the groats may be a little slimy ¡ª that’s perfectly normal: just rinse them and use them according to the recipe.

So for this buckwheat power bowl| I cooked it up the same way I cook stove-top oats. I used unsweetened vanilla almond milk and banana slices for a hint of sweetness and then added the canned pumpkin and pumpkin spice seasoning for a little taste of Fall. The buckwheat gives the bowl a distinct nutty flavor and a lovely boost of volume and creaminess.

To give it a powerful nutrient boost (and make it pretty)| I topped the bowl with chia seeds| dried apple slices| cranberries| and pecans.

Time to dig in!

I think this bowl is perfectly sweet on its own| especially with a little dried fruit on top| but feel free to sprinkle on a little coconut sugar or a drizzle of maple syrup if you need it to be sweeter. I enjoyed the first serving warm| well| semiwarm| since I had to take photos of it (blogger problems!). I ate the second serving for breakfast this morning cold| straight from the fridge like overnight oats. It was delicious both ways!

Pumpkin Buckwheat Porridge Power Bowl

Eating Bird Food

Pumpkin Buckwheat Porridge Power Bowl

Notes

If you¡¯re new to buckwheat groats| look for the raw version| not the toasted version| which is often called kasha. You¡¯ll likely find it at your local health food store in the bulk-bin section or in the grain aisle.

Serving size: 1 bowl without toppings | Calories: 245 | Fat: 3 | Carbohydrates: 50 | Sugar: 10 | Fiber: 9 | Protein: 7