The Perfect Breakfast Smoothie For Coffee-Lovers

I’ve eliminated a number of things from my diet ¡ª?even for a short period of time ¡ª but caffeine is not on that list. Luckily, there are a bunch of benefits to a coffee habit like improved workout performance and disease-fighting antioxidants. I can’t get through the morning without a cup of coffee, but when I’m in a rush, I’m sorry to say it sometimes comes at the price of proper breakfast.

This caffeinated smoothie changes everything, since it combines cold-brew coffee and breakfast in one glass. Low in calories and high in protein, this chocolate drink will keep you fueled and energized until your next snack or meal. Coffee-lovers (or former breakfast-haters) will fall hard for this creamy and sweet smoothie.

Cold-Brew Breakfast Smoothie

From Lizzie Fuhr, POPSUGAR Fitness

Cold-Brew Breakfast Smoothie

Healthy Coffee Smoothie

Ingredients

1 cup cold-brew coffee (I used Stumptown, but you could make your own)1 scoop chocolate protein powder (I used Philosophie’s Cacao Magic)1 cup unsweetened almond milk1/2 cup low-fat yogurt1/2 avocado5 ice cubes1 1/2 teaspoons maple syrup

Cacao nibs, optional garnish

The Perfect Breakfast Smoothie For Coffee-Lovers

I’ve eliminated a number of things from my diet ¡ª?even for a short period of time ¡ª but caffeine is not on that list. Luckily| there are a bunch of benefits to a coffee habit like improved workout performance and disease-fighting antioxidants. I can’t get through the morning without a cup of coffee| but when I’m in a rush| I’m sorry to say it sometimes comes at the price of proper breakfast.

This caffeinated smoothie changes everything| since it combines cold-brew coffee and breakfast in one glass. Low in calories and high in protein| this chocolate drink will keep you fueled and energized until your next snack or meal. Coffee-lovers (or former breakfast-haters) will fall hard for this creamy and sweet smoothie.

Cold-Brew Breakfast Smoothie

From Lizzie Fuhr| POPSUGAR Fitness

Cold-Brew Breakfast Smoothie

Healthy Coffee Smoothie

Ingredients

1 cup cold-brew coffee (I used Stumptown| but you could make your own)1 scoop chocolate protein powder (I used Philosophie’s Cacao Magic)1 cup unsweetened almond milk1/2 cup low-fat yogurt1/2 avocado5 ice cubes1 1/2 teaspoons maple syrup

Cacao nibs| optional garnish

Here’s Why You Can (and Should!) Sip a Cup of Joe Every Day

I can’t function before my first cup of coffee. I’ve been sipping the dark stuff every day since I was 15 years old and picked up a more serious habit during my college years. While I’ve backed off those twice-a-day doppios (I know, I can’t believe it either), I still enjoy a cup of strong black coffee every morning. For years, I toyed with the idea of giving up caffeine for good, but lucky for me, there’s a ton of research out there supporting my java habit.

It eases muscle pain: Drinking coffee before a workout has been proven to prevent post-workout soreness. One University of Georgia study found that moderate doses of caffeine can reduce the pain by nearly 50 percent ¡ª?and anyone who has dealt with DOMS knows that it is no laughing matter.

It improves your memory: There’s promising research that the caffeine in coffee has a positive effect on memory and thought processes, specifically when it comes to Alzheimer’s disease. Mice with the rodent equivalent of Alzheimer’s disease who consumed caffeine-spiked drinking water experienced a reduction in the levels of a protein in the brain that is a key aspect of the disease.

It keeps you regular: Coffee may help you “go” for a few reasons. Drinking warm liquids gets things moving, and just the fact that it’s a liquid helps as well, since staying hydrated is one way to prevent constipation. And coffee itself is a powerful stimulant that encourages muscle contractions in the digestive tract.

It fights against disease: The antioxidants in coffee have been shown to decrease the risk of diabetes, heart disease, certain cancers, gallstones, and Parkinson’s. These risks might not seem pressing right now, but your future self will thank you for doing whatever you can to prevent these health issues from happening.

It increases endurance: Running a race soon? You might consider sipping on a cup of joe before heading to the starting line. Studies have found that drinking a cup of coffee before can help increase your endurance.

With all that said, I hate to admit it, but coffee isn’t a miracle beverage. Drinking too much can contribute to high blood pressure, sleep issues, headaches, and digestive problems. Just be sure to stick to 300 milligrams or less of caffeinated beverages a day to keep your java habit in check and your body in tip-top shape.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography

Here’s Why You Can (and Should!) Sip a Cup of Joe Every Day

I can’t function before my first cup of coffee. I’ve been sipping the dark stuff every day since I was 15 years old and picked up a more serious habit during my college years. While I’ve backed off those twice-a-day doppios (I know| I can’t believe it either)| I still enjoy a cup of strong black coffee every morning. For years| I toyed with the idea of giving up caffeine for good| but lucky for me| there’s a ton of research out there supporting my java habit.

It eases muscle pain: Drinking coffee before a workout has been proven to prevent post-workout soreness. One University of Georgia study found that moderate doses of caffeine can reduce the pain by nearly 50 percent ¡ª?and anyone who has dealt with DOMS knows that it is no laughing matter.

It improves your memory: There’s promising research that the caffeine in coffee has a positive effect on memory and thought processes| specifically when it comes to Alzheimer’s disease. Mice with the rodent equivalent of Alzheimer’s disease who consumed caffeine-spiked drinking water experienced a reduction in the levels of a protein in the brain that is a key aspect of the disease.

It keeps you regular: Coffee may help you “go” for a few reasons. Drinking warm liquids gets things moving| and just the fact that it’s a liquid helps as well| since staying hydrated is one way to prevent constipation. And coffee itself is a powerful stimulant that encourages muscle contractions in the digestive tract.

It fights against disease: The antioxidants in coffee have been shown to decrease the risk of diabetes| heart disease| certain cancers| gallstones| and Parkinson’s. These risks might not seem pressing right now| but your future self will thank you for doing whatever you can to prevent these health issues from happening.

It increases endurance: Running a race soon? You might consider sipping on a cup of joe before heading to the starting line. Studies have found that drinking a cup of coffee before can help increase your endurance.

With all that said| I hate to admit it| but coffee isn’t a miracle beverage. Drinking too much can contribute to high blood pressure| sleep issues| headaches| and digestive problems. Just be sure to stick to 300 milligrams or less of caffeinated beverages a day to keep your java habit in check and your body in tip-top shape.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography

Boost Your Metabolism With This Cooling Limeade

If you’re looking for a cooling and caffeinated pick-me-up, look no further than this metabolism-boosting iced green tea. The addition of citrus increases the antioxidant levels of green tea while giving the drink a refreshing tang. Plus, this recipe is as easy to make as it is to sip.

From Susi May, POPSUGAR Fitness

Green Tea Lime Cooler

Notes

You can make this recipe with jasmine tea for a more floral tasting drink. Triple the recipe to make a pitcher.

Boost Your Metabolism With This Cooling Limeade

If you’re looking for a cooling and caffeinated pick-me-up| look no further than this metabolism-boosting iced green tea. The addition of citrus increases the antioxidant levels of green tea while giving the drink a refreshing tang. Plus| this recipe is as easy to make as it is to sip.

From Susi May| POPSUGAR Fitness

Green Tea Lime Cooler

Notes

You can make this recipe with jasmine tea for a more floral tasting drink. Triple the recipe to make a pitcher.

Just How Much Coffee Is Too Much?

There are many benefits to drinking coffee every day ¡ª from disease-fighting antioxidants to improved memory and longevity ¡ª?but when it comes to your caffeine habit, there really can be too much of a good thing.

Just how much caffeine is too much? For the average person, up to 300 mg of coffee a day, or two to four cups of the average brewed coffee, is a moderate amount that isn’t harmful. But once you hit more than four cups, you may experience less-than-desirable side effects. Drinking more than 500 mg every day, in fact, can induce anxiety, insomnia, and muscle tremors and can even lead to increased heart rate and blood pressure, headaches, or digestion issues.

If you want to stay away from the caffeine jitters, then limiting yourself to under four cups of coffee per day is a perfectly reasonable plan. However, you may be surprised by how much caffeine is in your favorite caffeinated beverage; it can be much more than you think! See how much caffeine is in your favorite drink.

Drink Amount of caffeine

Average 8-ounce cup of coffee95 mg8-ounce Short Starbucks coffee180 mg12-ounce Tall Starbucks coffee260 mg16-ounce Grande Starbucks coffee330 mg20-ounce Venti Starbucks coffee415 mg10-ounce small Dunkin’ Donuts coffee105 mg14-ounce medium Dunkin’ Donuts coffee178 mg20-ounce large Dunkin’ Donuts coffee with Turbo Shot436 mg16-ounce large McDonald’s coffee133 mgAverage 1-ounce espresso shot64 mg1-ounce Starbucks espresso shot75 mgAverage teaspoon of instant coffee31 mgAverage 8-ounce cup of black tea26 mgAverage 6-ounce cup of green tea20-30 mg

Use this chart as a guide to see how much caffeine you’re really consuming every day. Even if you enjoy two eight-ounce cups at Starbucks, for example, that’s 360 mg of caffeine ¡ª 60 mg over the recommended limit. Also, remember that even though espresso-based drinks like lattes and cappuccinos contain less caffeine than brewed coffee, many drinks are made with at least two espresso shots, not one.

Image Source: Thinkstock

Just How Much Coffee Is Too Much?

There are many benefits to drinking coffee every day ¡ª from disease-fighting antioxidants to improved memory and longevity ¡ª?but when it comes to your caffeine habit| there really can be too much of a good thing.

Just how much caffeine is too much? For the average person| up to 300 mg of coffee a day| or two to four cups of the average brewed coffee| is a moderate amount that isn’t harmful. But once you hit more than four cups| you may experience less-than-desirable side effects. Drinking more than 500 mg every day| in fact| can induce anxiety| insomnia| and muscle tremors and can even lead to increased heart rate and blood pressure| headaches| or digestion issues.

If you want to stay away from the caffeine jitters| then limiting yourself to under four cups of coffee per day is a perfectly reasonable plan. However| you may be surprised by how much caffeine is in your favorite caffeinated beverage; it can be much more than you think! See how much caffeine is in your favorite drink.

Drink Amount of caffeine

Average 8-ounce cup of coffee95 mg8-ounce Short Starbucks coffee180 mg12-ounce Tall Starbucks coffee260 mg16-ounce Grande Starbucks coffee330 mg20-ounce Venti Starbucks coffee415 mg10-ounce small Dunkin’ Donuts coffee105 mg14-ounce medium Dunkin’ Donuts coffee178 mg20-ounce large Dunkin’ Donuts coffee with Turbo Shot436 mg16-ounce large McDonald’s coffee133 mgAverage 1-ounce espresso shot64 mg1-ounce Starbucks espresso shot75 mgAverage teaspoon of instant coffee31 mgAverage 8-ounce cup of black tea26 mgAverage 6-ounce cup of green tea20-30 mg

Use this chart as a guide to see how much caffeine you’re really consuming every day. Even if you enjoy two eight-ounce cups at Starbucks| for example| that’s 360 mg of caffeine ¡ª 60 mg over the recommended limit. Also| remember that even though espresso-based drinks like lattes and cappuccinos contain less caffeine than brewed coffee| many drinks are made with at least two espresso shots| not one.

Image Source: Thinkstock