Forget Apples! Why You Should Be Eating a Pear a Day

With school buses and cooler breezes blowing by, instead of being depressed about Summer being over, revel in the fact that it’s Fall! No more hot and humid workouts, plus a whole world of autumnal produce is at your fingertips. While apples get most of the attention, pears should not be ignored. The soft, sweet, buttery flesh of the pear makes this Fall fruit perfect for enjoying fresh or for using in healthy recipes, like these edamame and pear crostinis or this pear berry smoothie. Plus, there are so many varieties to choose from ¡ª Bartlett, Bosc, and Anjou ¡ª that they each seem like a different fruit. These juicy gems are pretty healthy for you, too.

Pears are one of the highest-fiber fruits, offering six grams per medium-sized fruit, helping you meet your daily requirement of 25 to 30 grams. Filling up on fiber keeps you regular to prevent a bloated belly caused by constipation, which also helps prevent colon cancer. A diet high in fiber can also keep your cholesterol levels down, which is good news for your ticker. Getting your fill of fiber from fruit is also linked to a reduced risk of breast cancer, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes.Pears contain a fair amount of vitamins C, K, B2, B3, and B6. For expecting or nursing moms, they also contain folate. Pears aren’t too shabby in the mineral department either, containing calcium, magnesium, potassium, copper, and manganese. Vitamin C and copper are antioxidant nutrients, so eating pears is good for your immune system and may help prevent cancer.Pears also contain boron, which our bodies need in order to retain calcium, so this fruit can also be linked to prevention of osteoporosis.The phytonutrients found in pears are also associated with preventing stomach cancer. It’s a hypoallergenic fruit, which means those with food sensitivities can usually eat pears with no adverse effects.Eating three or more servings of fruits a day, such as pears, may also lower your risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), the primary cause of vision loss in older adults.Quercetin is another antioxidant found in the skin of pears. It’s beneficial for cancer prevention and can help reduce blood pressure, so don’t peel your pears!Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Jenny Sugar

Forget Apples! Why You Should Be Eating a Pear a Day

With school buses and cooler breezes blowing by| instead of being depressed about Summer being over| revel in the fact that it’s Fall! No more hot and humid workouts| plus a whole world of autumnal produce is at your fingertips. While apples get most of the attention| pears should not be ignored. The soft| sweet| buttery flesh of the pear makes this Fall fruit perfect for enjoying fresh or for using in healthy recipes| like these edamame and pear crostinis or this pear berry smoothie. Plus| there are so many varieties to choose from ¡ª Bartlett| Bosc| and Anjou ¡ª that they each seem like a different fruit. These juicy gems are pretty healthy for you| too.

Pears are one of the highest-fiber fruits| offering six grams per medium-sized fruit| helping you meet your daily requirement of 25 to 30 grams. Filling up on fiber keeps you regular to prevent a bloated belly caused by constipation| which also helps prevent colon cancer. A diet high in fiber can also keep your cholesterol levels down| which is good news for your ticker. Getting your fill of fiber from fruit is also linked to a reduced risk of breast cancer| heart disease| and type 2 diabetes.Pears contain a fair amount of vitamins C| K| B2| B3| and B6. For expecting or nursing moms| they also contain folate. Pears aren’t too shabby in the mineral department either| containing calcium| magnesium| potassium| copper| and manganese. Vitamin C and copper are antioxidant nutrients| so eating pears is good for your immune system and may help prevent cancer.Pears also contain boron| which our bodies need in order to retain calcium| so this fruit can also be linked to prevention of osteoporosis.The phytonutrients found in pears are also associated with preventing stomach cancer. It’s a hypoallergenic fruit| which means those with food sensitivities can usually eat pears with no adverse effects.Eating three or more servings of fruits a day| such as pears| may also lower your risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD)| the primary cause of vision loss in older adults.Quercetin is another antioxidant found in the skin of pears. It’s beneficial for cancer prevention and can help reduce blood pressure| so don’t peel your pears!Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Jenny Sugar

Is a Pooping Stool the Answer to Your Bloating Issues?

Recently at a good friend’s dinner party, while using her bathroom I noticed a stool next to the toilet. Her kids were way past the small-kid stage of needing a step in order to clamber onto the potty seat, so I made a casual joke about her needing it after one too many glasses of wine. She pulled me aside, got a very serious look on her face, and said, “No. I use it. To poop.”

And there you have it. My mind was blown right then and there. As she explained how she used the stool ¡ª thankfully sparing me any specific details ¡ª it made total sense. Get ready because I’m about to lay down some serious bathroom talk.

The issue with sitting while having a bowel movement is that it totally blocks the flow from your colon. We all have a Puborectalis muscle that squeezes around the place where the colon meets the rectum, helping to maintain continence (it prevents solid waste from falling out until you’re ready). Sitting only allows that muscle to partially relax, which is why it can take people a long time sitting (and straining) for anything to happen. When your body can assume a squatting position with your knees above your hips, it relaxes the Puborectalis muscle fully and allows your colon to empty quickly and completely.

There are even slanted stools specifically designed for this purpose, like the Squatty Potty. This space-saver has a cutout in the middle so it fits around your toilet when you’re not using it. You can also buy a regular step stool so no one knows what you’re using it for; just make sure it’s the right height, allowing a comfortable squatting position.

Beginner squatters can keep their bum resting on the seat, but for those more adventurous types, you can try putting all your weight on the stool and actually squatting (heck, you’ll get in a great butt and thigh workout while you’re at it!). And don’t feel frustrated if things don’t go as planned on your first go at it ¡ª this could take some time to figure out the right stool height and feet positioning. And you might be surprised how much more you can eliminate from the simple act of opening up your hips. If constipation is all too familiar, this may be the cure to your digestive woes.

If you’ve never heard of using a stool for your stool, your skepticism is understandable. But hey, if you made it this far reading all about squatting while pooping, there’s some part of you that’s intrigued and can’t wait until the urge comes on so you can try it for yourself. One thing we can all agree on is that it’s amazing what taking a proper poop first thing in the morning can do for the soul ¡ª it sets the tone for the entire day. You owe it to yourself, and those around you to have a happier morning by giving this a try. It could change the way you poop forever.

Image Source: Amazon

Is a Pooping Stool the Answer to Your Bloating Issues?

Recently at a good friend’s dinner party| while using her bathroom I noticed a stool next to the toilet. Her kids were way past the small-kid stage of needing a step in order to clamber onto the potty seat| so I made a casual joke about her needing it after one too many glasses of wine. She pulled me aside| got a very serious look on her face| and said| “No. I use it. To poop.”

And there you have it. My mind was blown right then and there. As she explained how she used the stool ¡ª thankfully sparing me any specific details ¡ª it made total sense. Get ready because I’m about to lay down some serious bathroom talk.

The issue with sitting while having a bowel movement is that it totally blocks the flow from your colon. We all have a Puborectalis muscle that squeezes around the place where the colon meets the rectum| helping to maintain continence (it prevents solid waste from falling out until you’re ready). Sitting only allows that muscle to partially relax| which is why it can take people a long time sitting (and straining) for anything to happen. When your body can assume a squatting position with your knees above your hips| it relaxes the Puborectalis muscle fully and allows your colon to empty quickly and completely.

There are even slanted stools specifically designed for this purpose| like the Squatty Potty. This space-saver has a cutout in the middle so it fits around your toilet when you’re not using it. You can also buy a regular step stool so no one knows what you’re using it for; just make sure it’s the right height| allowing a comfortable squatting position.

Beginner squatters can keep their bum resting on the seat| but for those more adventurous types| you can try putting all your weight on the stool and actually squatting (heck| you’ll get in a great butt and thigh workout while you’re at it!). And don’t feel frustrated if things don’t go as planned on your first go at it ¡ª this could take some time to figure out the right stool height and feet positioning. And you might be surprised how much more you can eliminate from the simple act of opening up your hips. If constipation is all too familiar| this may be the cure to your digestive woes.

If you’ve never heard of using a stool for your stool| your skepticism is understandable. But hey| if you made it this far reading all about squatting while pooping| there’s some part of you that’s intrigued and can’t wait until the urge comes on so you can try it for yourself. One thing we can all agree on is that it’s amazing what taking a proper poop first thing in the morning can do for the soul ¡ª it sets the tone for the entire day. You owe it to yourself| and those around you to have a happier morning by giving this a try. It could change the way you poop forever.

Image Source: Amazon

Stop Waiting For It: Tips to Make Your Bathroom Trips More Regular

Eat more fiber: When it comes to regularity in your bathroom schedule, fiber in your diet is a must. You can take a supplement like Metamucil, but getting the nutrient straight from a food source is always best. The Mayo Clinic recommends women consume 25 grams of fiber per day. If you are falling short, up your intake by eating these high-fiber foods like raspberries and chia seeds.

Drink more water: Consistent hydration is essential for regular bowel movements. Drinking water helps stimulate your digestive tract, breaking down food, which in turn, prevents constipation. Finish that glass of water on your desk ¡ª and then go grab another.

Make lunch your largest: If dinner is consistently your largest meal of the day, try mixing things up. Ayurveda experts recommend making lunch your largest meal of the day and eating it between 12 and 2 p.m., since this is the time the digestive agni (fire) is working at its maximum potency.

Try probiotics: Probiotics help rebuild good bacteria and support digestion, so whether you’ve recently been on antibiotics or the bacteria in you’re gut is not balanced, probiotics can change the game for the better. You can take a supplement from the health food store, or start incorporating these probiotic-rich foods like yogurt or kombucha into your diet.

Exercise regularly: Skipping out on workouts is not helping you out in the bathroom department. Lack of exercise can even slow down your digestive tract. Even when your belly is feeling uncomfortably full, make time to move. Start with this yoga sequence that will help ease digestive woes and get things moving.

Stop stressing: When you’re tense, stressed, or anxious, it’s very common for things to get bound up. Move through these beginner-friendly calming yoga poses, or start making a short meditation practice a daily ritual. It’s incredible how your body (and belly) will respond if you make de-stressing a priority. Regular exercise will help combat your stress levels, too!

Image Source: Shutterstock

Stop Waiting For It: Tips to Make Your Bathroom Trips More Regular

Eat more fiber: When it comes to regularity in your bathroom schedule| fiber in your diet is a must. You can take a supplement like Metamucil| but getting the nutrient straight from a food source is always best. The Mayo Clinic recommends women consume 25 grams of fiber per day. If you are falling short| up your intake by eating these high-fiber foods like raspberries and chia seeds.

Drink more water: Consistent hydration is essential for regular bowel movements. Drinking water helps stimulate your digestive tract| breaking down food| which in turn| prevents constipation. Finish that glass of water on your desk and then go grab another.

Make lunch your largest: If dinner is consistently your largest meal of the day| try mixing things up. Ayurveda experts recommend making lunch your largest meal of the day and eating it between 12 and 2 p.m.| since this is the time the digestive agni (fire) is working at its maximum potency.

Try probiotics: Probiotics help rebuild good bacteria and support digestion| so whether you’ve recently been on antibiotics or the bacteria in you’re gut is not balanced| probiotics can change the game for the better. You can take a supplement from the health food store| or start incorporating these probiotic-rich foods like yogurt or kombucha into your diet.

Exercise regularly: Skipping out on workouts is not helping you out in the bathroom department. Lack of exercise can even slow down your digestive tract. Even when your belly is feeling uncomfortably full| make time to move. Start with this yoga sequence that will help ease digestive woes and get things moving.

Stop stressing: When you’re tense| stressed| or anxious| it’s very common for things to get bound up. Move through these beginner-friendly calming yoga poses| or start making a short meditation practice a daily ritual. It’s incredible how your body (and belly) will respond if you make de-stressing a priority. Regular exercise will help combat your stress levels| too!

Image Source: Shutterstock