What You Need to Know About Exercising With Sore Muscles

Even if you exercise regularly, you’ve felt it: the aching, can’t-sit-down-or-lift-my-arm muscle soreness the next day after a workout. That pain you feel a day or two after an intense workout is known as DOMS, or delayed onset muscle soreness, and is caused by muscle microtearing, which helps build muscle fiber and make them stronger. As easy as it may be to use muscle soreness as a reason to skip your next-day workout (guilty as charged!), DOMS is rarely a good excuse to bypass the gym. Here’s what you should be doing instead.

Don’t premedicate. “Don’t mask what your body is telling you,” says Crunch trainer Tim Rich. He advises clients to not take painkillers before a workout so they can understand how their body reacts to a workout. Taking Advil before your workout could, for example, cause you to push yourself farther than you should go or mask an injury until it’s too late. If you’re experiencing DOMS after a workout, however, an NSAID or other anti-inflammatory OTC painkiller and icing where you hurt can help.Assess the pain. It’s one thing to have DOMS, which is a good thing. But if you finish a workout and feel like you are uncharacteristically sore, or that you’ve injured yourself, pushing through the pain may not be the best thing. “If you’re new to working out, aches and pains are normal,” says running coach Eric Chen. However, when workout pain feels more like a burning sensation, it “automatically means stop right there and rest.” In addition, Eric recommends seeking out professional advice if you experience an abnormal pain that reoccurs when you exercise again. Make sure you pay attention the difference between an injury pain and normal muscle soreness, and stop and rest if you feel like you’ve strained something.Eat protein. Muscles are made out of protein, so to shorten the time it takes muscles to heal, try to eat some sort of protein right after you exercise ¡ª?this will also help you build more muscle over time. Studies have found that recovery drinks that contain protein help decrease muscle soreness compared to normal carbohydrate-based sports drinks.Alternate workouts. Being too sore to work out may be a popular excuse, but it’s not always a good one. If you’re nursing sore legs from a rigorous hike, spend the next day working on your abs or arms. Allowing an overworked part of your body time to rest while working on another is a great way to optimize your time and ensure that you stay on track. You can also opt for another aerobic exercise or yoga ¡ª?cardio and stretching can both help soothe your muscles.

No matter how you deal with muscle soreness, it shouldn’t last forever. Go see a doctor if you find that your soreness isn’t getting any better.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Ericka McConnell

What You Need to Know About Exercising With Sore Muscles

Even if you exercise regularly| you’ve felt it: the aching| can’t-sit-down-or-lift-my-arm muscle soreness the next day after a workout. That pain you feel a day or two after an intense workout is known as DOMS| or delayed onset muscle soreness| and is caused by muscle microtearing| which helps build muscle fiber and make them stronger. As easy as it may be to use muscle soreness as a reason to skip your next-day workout (guilty as charged!)| DOMS is rarely a good excuse to bypass the gym. Here’s what you should be doing instead.

Don’t premedicate. “Don’t mask what your body is telling you|” says Crunch trainer Tim Rich. He advises clients to not take painkillers before a workout so they can understand how their body reacts to a workout. Taking Advil before your workout could| for example| cause you to push yourself farther than you should go or mask an injury until it’s too late. If you’re experiencing DOMS after a workout| however| an NSAID or other anti-inflammatory OTC painkiller and icing where you hurt can help.Assess the pain. It’s one thing to have DOMS| which is a good thing. But if you finish a workout and feel like you are uncharacteristically sore| or that you’ve injured yourself| pushing through the pain may not be the best thing. “If you’re new to working out| aches and pains are normal|” says running coach Eric Chen. However| when workout pain feels more like a burning sensation| it “automatically means stop right there and rest.” In addition| Eric recommends seeking out professional advice if you experience an abnormal pain that reoccurs when you exercise again. Make sure you pay attention the difference between an injury pain and normal muscle soreness| and stop and rest if you feel like you’ve strained something.Eat protein. Muscles are made out of protein| so to shorten the time it takes muscles to heal| try to eat some sort of protein right after you exercise ¡ª?this will also help you build more muscle over time. Studies have found that recovery drinks that contain protein help decrease muscle soreness compared to normal carbohydrate-based sports drinks.Alternate workouts. Being too sore to work out may be a popular excuse| but it’s not always a good one. If you’re nursing sore legs from a rigorous hike| spend the next day working on your abs or arms. Allowing an overworked part of your body time to rest while working on another is a great way to optimize your time and ensure that you stay on track. You can also opt for another aerobic exercise or yoga ¡ª?cardio and stretching can both help soothe your muscles.

No matter how you deal with muscle soreness| it shouldn’t last forever. Go see a doctor if you find that your soreness isn’t getting any better.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Ericka McConnell

Speedy Recovery: 10 Ways to Ease Sore Muscles

After an intense cardio workout or weight-training session, you might feel extreme exhaustion, muscle soreness, and nausea. This hit-by-a-truck feeling that you often wake up with the day after working out is called DOMS, which stands for delayed onset muscle soreness. Luckily, there are many preventative measures you can take to avoid it. Here’s a quick list of 10 steps you should always take before, during, and after going to the gym.

    Drink a cup or two of caffeinated tea or coffee before working out to increase muscular strength and endurance and reduce the chance of soreness.Eat a pre-workout snack that is low-fat and high-carb with some protein.Warm up properly with a little cardio and dynamic stretching to prep your muscles and joints for your workout.Do not stop and start moving while exercising; instead, keep steadily moving so fresh blood will be sent to repair your taxed muscles.While you are working out, stay hydrated by drinking water every 15 minutes.If you are sweating a lot, it’s important to replace lost electrolytes with a sports drink or other electrolyte-rich foods, because these essential salts regulate heartbeats, muscular contractions, and nerve function.After your workout, stretch and use a foam roller to massage out knots and increase blood flow to your muscles.Immediately after working out, eat a post-workout snack that has a 4:1 ratio of carbs to protein to help restore the nutrients lost in the muscles during the workout. Try chocolate milk or a protein snack washed down with tart cherry juice, which has also been shown to reduce soreness.Consider getting a sports massage to increase circulation and break up major knots in problem areas that are always sore.Take a cold shower post-workout to reduce inflammation of the muscles. Or try an ice bath, which has been shown to reduce muscle soreness by 20 percent.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography

Speedy Recovery: 10 Ways to Ease Sore Muscles

After an intense cardio workout or weight-training session| you might feel extreme exhaustion| muscle soreness| and nausea. This hit-by-a-truck feeling that you often wake up with the day after working out is called DOMS| which stands for delayed onset muscle soreness. Luckily| there are many preventative measures you can take to avoid it. Here’s a quick list of 10 steps you should always take before| during| and after going to the gym.

    Drink a cup or two of caffeinated tea or coffee before working out to increase muscular strength and endurance and reduce the chance of soreness.Eat a pre-workout snack that is low-fat and high-carb with some protein.Warm up properly with a little cardio and dynamic stretching to prep your muscles and joints for your workout.Do not stop and start moving while exercising; instead| keep steadily moving so fresh blood will be sent to repair your taxed muscles.While you are working out| stay hydrated by drinking water every 15 minutes.If you are sweating a lot| it’s important to replace lost electrolytes with a sports drink or other electrolyte-rich foods| because these essential salts regulate heartbeats| muscular contractions| and nerve function.After your workout| stretch and use a foam roller to massage out knots and increase blood flow to your muscles.Immediately after working out| eat a post-workout snack that has a 4:1 ratio of carbs to protein to help restore the nutrients lost in the muscles during the workout. Try chocolate milk or a protein snack washed down with tart cherry juice| which has also been shown to reduce soreness.Consider getting a sports massage to increase circulation and break up major knots in problem areas that are always sore.Take a cold shower post-workout to reduce inflammation of the muscles. Or try an ice bath| which has been shown to reduce muscle soreness by 20 percent.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography

Why You’re Sore After a Workout

Some people thrive on it, some people hate it, but if you’re working out and challenging your body, you’ll definitely experience it: the day-after muscle soreness that makes you feel a little bit like you’ve been hit by a bus.

While it may be hard to sit after a circuit workout full of squats or you can’t raise your arms to brush your hair a day after a killer tricep-sculpting session, DOMS, or delayed-onset muscle soreness, should be a suffered through with pride. That soreness means that you’ve worked muscles you may not be using regularly or challenged already strong muscles in a way that will build even more strength. Either way, the soreness happens because your muscles have been worked and are better for it. “You’re basically tearing something and creating a micro trauma in the muscle,” says celebrity trainer Harley Pasternak. “When the muscle recovers, it’s going to recover stronger and denser than it was before.”

While you may feel sore mere hours after a workout, DOMS usually peaks a day or two after a sweat session. It’s nothing to worry about ¡ª in fact, you should be proud that you’re building body-sculpting, calorie-burning muscles ¡ª but you should recognize the difference between a good kind of pain like DOMS and the type of pain that could signal an exercise-related injury. In general, all-over soreness or aches, especially well after your workout is over, is fine. If you feel a sharp pain or a burning sensation in any muscle group while you work out, however, you should stop exercising, rest, and seek out expert advice as soon as possible.

RELATED:

How to recover faster after a workout10 ways to ease DOMSWhy you shouldn’t always be sore after a workoutImage Source: POPSUGAR Photography

Why You’re Sore After a Workout

Some people thrive on it| some people hate it| but if you’re working out and challenging your body| you’ll definitely experience it: the day-after muscle soreness that makes you feel a little bit like you’ve been hit by a bus.

While it may be hard to sit after a circuit workout full of squats or you can’t raise your arms to brush your hair a day after a killer tricep-sculpting session| DOMS| or delayed-onset muscle soreness| should be a suffered through with pride. That soreness means that you’ve worked muscles you may not be using regularly or challenged already strong muscles in a way that will build even more strength. Either way| the soreness happens because your muscles have been worked and are better for it. “You’re basically tearing something and creating a micro trauma in the muscle|” says celebrity trainer Harley Pasternak. “When the muscle recovers| it’s going to recover stronger and denser than it was before.”

While you may feel sore mere hours after a workout| DOMS usually peaks a day or two after a sweat session. It’s nothing to worry about ¡ª in fact| you should be proud that you’re building body-sculpting| calorie-burning muscles ¡ª but you should recognize the difference between a good kind of pain like DOMS and the type of pain that could signal an exercise-related injury. In general| all-over soreness or aches| especially well after your workout is over| is fine. If you feel a sharp pain or a burning sensation in any muscle group while you work out| however| you should stop exercising| rest| and seek out expert advice as soon as possible.

RELATED:

How to recover faster after a workout10 ways to ease DOMSWhy you shouldn’t always be sore after a workoutImage Source: POPSUGAR Photography