Why Eating Fast Might Just Be the Cause of Your Weight Gain

You’ve always eaten fast. It’s part of your eating habits. And you’ve always struggled with your weight. But what if you knew that eating fast and gaining weight go hand in hand. Men’s Health gives us the inside scoop to a new weight study.

Speed through supper and your gut may pay the price: finishing your meals quickly can up your odds of putting on extra weight, a review from Japan suggests.

After crunching the numbers from 23 studies, the researchers concluded that self-reported fast eaters were more than twice as likely to be obese than those who said they ate more slowly.

There are likely a number of factors responsible for the link, the researchers believe.

Take fullness, for instance. The longer food stays in your mouth, the more it triggers sensors in your tongue and oral cavity to send satiety signals to your brain, says Kathleen Melanson, Ph.D., of the University of Rhode Island who has also studied eating speed and weight.

Plus, the physical act of chewing sparks the release of a histamine in your neurons that reinforces the “I’m full” message, she says.

And if your brain recognizes that you’re stuffed, you’ll be less likely to reach for seconds, which cuts down on extra calories.

Still, shoveling down more food is likely not the only reason fast eaters tend to weigh more. In fact, when the review adjusted for total calories consumed, it found the link between obesity and eating speed still existed.

More research needs to be done to find out why, but it may have do with blood sugar levels.

When you eat slowly, your blood sugar creeps up in a more controlled fashion ¡ª not with the huge spikes you’d see if you gulped down dinner, Melanson says. This may help regulate your appetite throughout the day and how your body uses and stores its fuel.

Unfortunately, there’s no magic number for how long it should take you to eat, or how times you should chew before you swallow, she says. That’s because it depends on a bunch of variables, like the kind of food you’re eating and how big a bite you take. (A slab of steak, for instance, would take longer to chew than a spoonful of oatmeal.)

Your best bet, then, is to focus on the texture of the food before you send it sailing down your gullet. Chew enough so your food is broken down to a smooth, chunk-free consistency, Melanson says.

Then, wait until you feel the food go down your throat and hit your stomach before filling up your fork again.

“Take a deep breath or two and then go for the next bite,” she says.

Check out more great stories from Men’s Health:

The Lower-Body Circuit That Burns Buckets of FatHow Actor John Krasinski Got Incredibly Ripped in Just 4 MonthsThe Simple Way to Pack Hundreds of Push-Ups Into Your Daily RoutineImage Source: Shutterstock

Why Eating Fast Might Just Be the Cause of Your Weight Gain

You’ve always eaten fast. It’s part of your eating habits. And you’ve always struggled with your weight. But what if you knew that eating fast and gaining weight go hand in hand. Men’s Health gives us the inside scoop to a new weight study.

Speed through supper and your gut may pay the price: finishing your meals quickly can up your odds of putting on extra weight| a review from Japan suggests.

After crunching the numbers from 23 studies| the researchers concluded that self-reported fast eaters were more than twice as likely to be obese than those who said they ate more slowly.

There are likely a number of factors responsible for the link| the researchers believe.

Take fullness| for instance. The longer food stays in your mouth| the more it triggers sensors in your tongue and oral cavity to send satiety signals to your brain| says Kathleen Melanson| Ph.D.| of the University of Rhode Island who has also studied eating speed and weight.

Plus| the physical act of chewing sparks the release of a histamine in your neurons that reinforces the “I’m full” message| she says.

And if your brain recognizes that you’re stuffed| you’ll be less likely to reach for seconds| which cuts down on extra calories.

Still| shoveling down more food is likely not the only reason fast eaters tend to weigh more. In fact| when the review adjusted for total calories consumed| it found the link between obesity and eating speed still existed.

More research needs to be done to find out why| but it may have do with blood sugar levels.

When you eat slowly| your blood sugar creeps up in a more controlled fashion ¡ª not with the huge spikes you’d see if you gulped down dinner| Melanson says. This may help regulate your appetite throughout the day and how your body uses and stores its fuel.

Unfortunately| there’s no magic number for how long it should take you to eat| or how times you should chew before you swallow| she says. That’s because it depends on a bunch of variables| like the kind of food you’re eating and how big a bite you take. (A slab of steak| for instance| would take longer to chew than a spoonful of oatmeal.)

Your best bet| then| is to focus on the texture of the food before you send it sailing down your gullet. Chew enough so your food is broken down to a smooth| chunk-free consistency| Melanson says.

Then| wait until you feel the food go down your throat and hit your stomach before filling up your fork again.

“Take a deep breath or two and then go for the next bite|” she says.

Check out more great stories from Men’s Health:

The Lower-Body Circuit That Burns Buckets of FatHow Actor John Krasinski Got Incredibly Ripped in Just 4 MonthsThe Simple Way to Pack Hundreds of Push-Ups Into Your Daily RoutineImage Source: Shutterstock

Why Is White Rice So Much Unhealthier Than Brown Rice?

It’s been about six years now that I haven’t been able to eat gluten. Through trial and error, after finally cutting out bread, pastas, cakes, pizza, beer, and more, the tumultuous stomach tailspins stopped. Brown rice became my savior, since I was easily able to add it to many dishes and I was able to make the switch to brown rice pasta, brown rice bread, brown rice crackers, and more (and no, contrary to belief, it doesn’t taste like cardboard!).

I like to have a glass half full outlook on life, so when I learned that my croissant-obsessed days were over, I got creative in the kitchen, real creative. And not only that, but what I learned is that staying away from white rice and its cohorts is actually much better for me healthwise! Compared to white rice, brown rice is light years ahead in terms of nutritional value. Did you know that if you eat just two servings of brown rice a week, you can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, while eating white rice on a regular basis increases the chances of type 2 diabetes by 20 percent? Here’s a little tip for all you sushi lovers: If a restaurant doesn’t offer brown rice sushi, ask them if they can make your sushi without the rice. Tell them you’re not a stickler if it falls apart and they’ll usually oblige.

White rice is what’s inside brown rice after the brown rice is polished down, removing the bran and the beneficial nutrients.

Nutrients removed in the milling process include 67 percent of the vitamin B3, 80 percent of B1 vitamins, 90 percent of the vitamin B6, half the maganese and phosphorus, 60 percent of the iron, and all of the fiber and essential fatty acids. That’s why white rice comes “enriched” with B vitamins and iron.

Here’s the nutritional breakdown of both white rice and brown rice, which clearly illustrates how brown rice is in a league of its own when it comes to being packed full of nutrients.

1 Cup ServingWhite RiceBrown RiceCalories169216Maganese0.5 (mg)1.76 (mg)Selenium9.7 (mcg)19.11 (mcg)Magnesium8.7 (mg)83.85 (mg)Potassium17.4 (mg)83.85 (mg)

Wondering how to make the perfect pot of brown rice? This handy guide will help you.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Nicole Perry

Why Is White Rice So Much Unhealthier Than Brown Rice?

It’s been about six years now that I haven’t been able to eat gluten. Through trial and error| after finally cutting out bread| pastas| cakes| pizza| beer| and more| the tumultuous stomach tailspins stopped. Brown rice became my savior| since I was easily able to add it to many dishes and I was able to make the switch to brown rice pasta| brown rice bread| brown rice crackers| and more (and no| contrary to belief| it doesn’t taste like cardboard!).

I like to have a glass half full outlook on life| so when I learned that my croissant-obsessed days were over| I got creative in the kitchen| real creative. And not only that| but what I learned is that staying away from white rice and its cohorts is actually much better for me healthwise! Compared to white rice| brown rice is light years ahead in terms of nutritional value. Did you know that if you eat just two servings of brown rice a week| you can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes| while eating white rice on a regular basis increases the chances of type 2 diabetes by 20 percent? Here’s a little tip for all you sushi lovers: If a restaurant doesn’t offer brown rice sushi| ask them if they can make your sushi without the rice. Tell them you’re not a stickler if it falls apart and they’ll usually oblige.

White rice is what’s inside brown rice after the brown rice is polished down| removing the bran and the beneficial nutrients.

Nutrients removed in the milling process include 67 percent of the vitamin B3| 80 percent of B1 vitamins| 90 percent of the vitamin B6| half the maganese and phosphorus| 60 percent of the iron| and all of the fiber and essential fatty acids. That’s why white rice comes “enriched” with B vitamins and iron.

Here’s the nutritional breakdown of both white rice and brown rice| which clearly illustrates how brown rice is in a league of its own when it comes to being packed full of nutrients.

1 Cup ServingWhite RiceBrown RiceCalories169216Maganese0.5 (mg)1.76 (mg)Selenium9.7 (mcg)19.11 (mcg)Magnesium8.7 (mg)83.85 (mg)Potassium17.4 (mg)83.85 (mg)

Wondering how to make the perfect pot of brown rice? This handy guide will help you.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Nicole Perry