What’s the Deal With Alcohol and Ibuprofen?

If you wake up with a headache after a night of overindulging, sometimes figuring out what painkiller to take can make the headache even worse. Taking acetaminophen (aka Tylenol) can lead to liver damage, but take note: you’re also not supposed to drink while taking ibuprofen.

Ibuprofen drugs (like Advil) are part of the anti-inflammatory drug family known as NSAIDs, which can cause tears in the stomach lining if taken on an empty belly. Add alcohol to the mix, and the potential danger is heightened. If you take ibuprofen when drinking more than the recommended amount for women (about two to three drinks), you increase your risk of stomach irritation and bleeding. This is especially true for people who are prone to ulcers.

But wait! Taking Tylenol when you’re hungover isn’t such a good idea either, and aspirin has its downsides too. Acetaminophen can lead to liver damage if you take it in large doses for more than a couple of days. Heavy drinkers who take acetaminophen and don’t eat enough can overtax their livers. According to researchers at Harvard Medical School:

If you drink a lot of alcohol ¡ª say, on a Saturday night ¡ª and take a normal dose of acetaminophen to deal with the hangover in the morning, you probably are not going to have liver problems. . . . The trouble starts when regular heavy drinkers take a lot of acetaminophen over a period of time ¡ª several days, at least, and maybe longer. (In this context, heavy drinkers are defined as people who regularly have three or more drinks a day.) A drinking habit and a poor diet often go hand in hand. Multiple high doses of acetaminophen are more dangerous for drinkers partly because their glutathione levels tend to be low because they don’t eat well.

It may sound like popping a few Tylenols after a night or two of heavy drinking can’t hurt, but the risks associated with taking Tylenol after recreational drinking are somewhat blurry. A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory group found in a review of its database and a large liver failure study that the median dose that led to liver failure was between 5,000 and 7,000 milligrams of acetaminophen per day ¡ª scarily close to the current daily limit of 4,000 milligrams (eight extra-strength Tylenol). The FDA group recommended lowering the daily limit to 3,250 milligrams (or 10 regular-strength Tylenol pills a day) to help prevent accidental overdose.

So what’s a hungover, headache-plagued gal to do ¡ª besides not drinking so much in the first place? Since the jury is still out on the exact effects of combining Advil or Tylenol with booze, it’s probably best just to tough it out. While a recent study in rats found that coffee and aspirin are the best remedies for relieving hangover symptoms, it didn’t look at possible alcohol interactions ¡ª and it is known that taking aspirin with alcohol can increase your risk of stomach bleeding. If you’re looking to remedy a hangover, your best bet is to go natural with options like this fresh-pressed hangover juice or a yoga sequence to relieve your symptoms. Even better, help prevent a hangover the next time with these tips.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / THEM TOO

What’s the Deal With Alcohol and Ibuprofen?

If you wake up with a headache after a night of overindulging| sometimes figuring out what painkiller to take can make the headache even worse. Taking acetaminophen (aka Tylenol) can lead to liver damage| but take note: you’re also not supposed to drink while taking ibuprofen.

Ibuprofen drugs (like Advil) are part of the anti-inflammatory drug family known as NSAIDs| which can cause tears in the stomach lining if taken on an empty belly. Add alcohol to the mix| and the potential danger is heightened. If you take ibuprofen when drinking more than the recommended amount for women (about two to three drinks)| you increase your risk of stomach irritation and bleeding. This is especially true for people who are prone to ulcers.

But wait! Taking Tylenol when you’re hungover isn’t such a good idea either| and aspirin has its downsides too. Acetaminophen can lead to liver damage if you take it in large doses for more than a couple of days. Heavy drinkers who take acetaminophen and don’t eat enough can overtax their livers. According to researchers at Harvard Medical School:

If you drink a lot of alcohol say| on a Saturday night and take a normal dose of acetaminophen to deal with the hangover in the morning| you probably are not going to have liver problems. . . . The trouble starts when regular heavy drinkers take a lot of acetaminophen over a period of time several days| at least| and maybe longer. (In this context| heavy drinkers are defined as people who regularly have three or more drinks a day.) A drinking habit and a poor diet often go hand in hand. Multiple high doses of acetaminophen are more dangerous for drinkers partly because their glutathione levels tend to be low because they don’t eat well.

It may sound like popping a few Tylenols after a night or two of heavy drinking can’t hurt| but the risks associated with taking Tylenol after recreational drinking are somewhat blurry. A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory group found in a review of its database and a large liver failure study that the median dose that led to liver failure was between 5|000 and 7|000 milligrams of acetaminophen per day scarily close to the current daily limit of 4|000 milligrams (eight extra-strength Tylenol). The FDA group recommended lowering the daily limit to 3|250 milligrams (or 10 regular-strength Tylenol pills a day) to help prevent accidental overdose.

So what’s a hungover| headache-plagued gal to do besides not drinking so much in the first place? Since the jury is still out on the exact effects of combining Advil or Tylenol with booze| it’s probably best just to tough it out. While a recent study in rats found that coffee and aspirin are the best remedies for relieving hangover symptoms| it didn’t look at possible alcohol interactions and it is known that taking aspirin with alcohol can increase your risk of stomach bleeding. If you’re looking to remedy a hangover| your best bet is to go natural with options like this fresh-pressed hangover juice or a yoga sequence to relieve your symptoms. Even better| help prevent a hangover the next time with these tips.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / THEM TOO

Asian Pear Juice May Be the New Hangover Cure

Gatorade, a strong cup of coffee, even hair of the dog ¡ª everyone has their own idea of the best liquid cure to fix that pounding head, disarming nausea, and unquenchable thirst that comes with a helluva hangover. The problem? A lot of the techniques we swear by aren’t actually backed by science. A research team from Australia, though, has found promising results in a sweet surprise: pear juice. (Although waking up like this too often is definitely one of 8 Signs You’re Drinking Too Much Alcohol.)

Scientists from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have been sifting through existing research looking for hidden benefits of pears. While the literature review is still ongoing, their first pass has revealed that when people drink Korean pear juice¡ªalso known as Asian pear juice¡ªbefore heading out for the night, they experience less harsh hangovers the next day.

“In our initial reviews, we can see reductions in blood acetaldehyde levels¡ªthe toxic metabolic thought to be responsible for hangover symptoms,” explains Manny Noakes, Ph.D., research director of Nutrition and Health with the CSIRO. Certain components in pears affect key enzymes in your body, which helps to speed up the rate at which you metabolize and eliminate alcohol (which is typically at the rate of one drink per hour), she explains. (Learn about The Body-Altering Effects of Alcohol.)

Not only does this mean you process alcohol at a healthier rate throughout the night, but also that you will feel much better the next day. In fact, those who drank pear juice saw a significant reduction in their overall hangover severity compared to those who took a placebo, particularly improving their ability to concentrate the next day, Noakes adds.

However, there is a catch: the benefit was only seen when people downed the juice before hitting the bars. If you can remember to be responsible beforehand, though, drinking roughly seven ounces of Korean pear juice may save you from a headache of a day tomorrow.

More from Shape:

Why Lateral Movement Workouts Are a Smart MoveBest Stretches For Every Fitness ClassWe’re Spending a Ridiculous Amount of Money on Take Out FoodImage Source: Shutterstock

Asian Pear Juice May Be the New Hangover Cure

Gatorade| a strong cup of coffee| even hair of the dog ¡ª everyone has their own idea of the best liquid cure to fix that pounding head| disarming nausea| and unquenchable thirst that comes with a helluva hangover. The problem? A lot of the techniques we swear by aren’t actually backed by science. A research team from Australia| though| has found promising results in a sweet surprise: pear juice. (Although waking up like this too often is definitely one of 8 Signs You’re Drinking Too Much Alcohol.)

Scientists from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have been sifting through existing research looking for hidden benefits of pears. While the literature review is still ongoing| their first pass has revealed that when people drink Korean pear juice¡ªalso known as Asian pear juice¡ªbefore heading out for the night| they experience less harsh hangovers the next day.

“In our initial reviews| we can see reductions in blood acetaldehyde levels¡ªthe toxic metabolic thought to be responsible for hangover symptoms|” explains Manny Noakes| Ph.D.| research director of Nutrition and Health with the CSIRO. Certain components in pears affect key enzymes in your body| which helps to speed up the rate at which you metabolize and eliminate alcohol (which is typically at the rate of one drink per hour)| she explains. (Learn about The Body-Altering Effects of Alcohol.)

Not only does this mean you process alcohol at a healthier rate throughout the night| but also that you will feel much better the next day. In fact| those who drank pear juice saw a significant reduction in their overall hangover severity compared to those who took a placebo| particularly improving their ability to concentrate the next day| Noakes adds.

However| there is a catch: the benefit was only seen when people downed the juice before hitting the bars. If you can remember to be responsible beforehand| though| drinking roughly seven ounces of Korean pear juice may save you from a headache of a day tomorrow.

More from Shape:

Why Lateral Movement Workouts Are a Smart MoveBest Stretches For Every Fitness ClassWe’re Spending a Ridiculous Amount of Money on Take Out FoodImage Source: Shutterstock

Here’s Permission to Skip Your Workout After a Big Night Out

With the holidays officially over, chances are you’ve had a fuzzy morning after a few too many festive drinks. The cure for a late night? Lots of rest, water, and food. But if you’re never one to nurse a hangover by spending quality time with your couch and Netflix, sweating out those toxins may seem like the best answer to dealing with a hangover. But will working out actually make you feel better?

While an ambitious endeavor, exercising on a hangover may not be the cure you’re looking for, says Ruth C. Engs, RN, Ed.D., a professor at Indiana University who researches the effects of drinking. You’re already dehydrated from the diuretic properties of alcohol; vigorous exercise will leave you even more so. That means that instead of feeling better, exercising may actually worsen your hangover symptoms. Even if you may feel amazing after a workout, chances are that it’s just from a temporary rush of endorphins. Add to that the irritability, stomach issues, and light and sound sensitivity that often accompany your day-after doldrums, and skipping that morning SoulCycle class for a few more minutes of much-needed shut-eye may be the best option for shaking a hangover. If you do feel up for it, opt for a light, low-impact workout, like a slow jog or an easy yoga class, to help lift your energy level and spirits. Just be sure to pack a water bottle in your gym bag.

Image Source: Shutterstock

Here’s Permission to Skip Your Workout After a Big Night Out

With the holidays officially over| chances are you’ve had a fuzzy morning after a few too many festive drinks. The cure for a late night? Lots of rest| water| and food. But if you’re never one to nurse a hangover by spending quality time with your couch and Netflix| sweating out those toxins may seem like the best answer to dealing with a hangover. But will working out actually make you feel better?

While an ambitious endeavor| exercising on a hangover may not be the cure you’re looking for| says Ruth C. Engs| RN| Ed.D.| a professor at Indiana University who researches the effects of drinking. You’re already dehydrated from the diuretic properties of alcohol; vigorous exercise will leave you even more so. That means that instead of feeling better| exercising may actually worsen your hangover symptoms. Even if you may feel amazing after a workout| chances are that it’s just from a temporary rush of endorphins. Add to that the irritability| stomach issues| and light and sound sensitivity that often accompany your day-after doldrums| and skipping that morning SoulCycle class for a few more minutes of much-needed shut-eye may be the best option for shaking a hangover. If you do feel up for it| opt for a light| low-impact workout| like a slow jog or an easy yoga class| to help lift your energy level and spirits. Just be sure to pack a water bottle in your gym bag.

Image Source: Shutterstock