Celery Recall Due to E.Coli Outbreak Affecting Starbucks, Costco, Safeway, and More

A perennial favorite when it comes to healthy snacks, celery is in the center of a major food recall due to an E. coli scare first reported by Costco last week. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that the celery-onion blend in the big-box chain’s popular chicken salad tested positive for E. coli. Since the initial report, 19 people in seven states have gotten sick.

The celery in question comes from Taylor Farms Pacific, which has since voluntarily recalled a total of 71 products (resulting in close to 200,000 individual items) that may contain the tainted celery. Stores affected include major chains like Safeway, Target, and Walmart, which sell sandwiches, salad kits, and veggie trays produced by the California-based food purveyor. Starbucks also announced it was pulling its popular Turkey & Stuffing Panini from hundreds of locations since it contains the celery from Taylor Farms Pacific.

E. coli is caused when ingesting feces (animal or human) and can cause diarrhea, vomiting, and, in more serious cases, death. The CDC warns that individuals should throw out any products that are being recalled from Taylor Farms Pacific. Be sure to check out the FDA’s complete list of the products in question.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Nicole Perry

Celery Recall Due to E.Coli Outbreak Affecting Starbucks, Costco, Safeway, and More

A perennial favorite when it comes to healthy snacks| celery is in the center of a major food recall due to an E. coli scare first reported by Costco last week. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that the celery-onion blend in the big-box chain’s popular chicken salad tested positive for E. coli. Since the initial report| 19 people in seven states have gotten sick.

The celery in question comes from Taylor Farms Pacific| which has since voluntarily recalled a total of 71 products (resulting in close to 200|000 individual items) that may contain the tainted celery. Stores affected include major chains like Safeway| Target| and Walmart| which sell sandwiches| salad kits| and veggie trays produced by the California-based food purveyor. Starbucks also announced it was pulling its popular Turkey & Stuffing Panini from hundreds of locations since it contains the celery from Taylor Farms Pacific.

E. coli is caused when ingesting feces (animal or human) and can cause diarrhea| vomiting| and| in more serious cases| death. The CDC warns that individuals should throw out any products that are being recalled from Taylor Farms Pacific. Be sure to check out the FDA’s complete list of the products in question.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Nicole Perry

Exercise and Alcohol May Be More Connected Than You Think, Study Says

There’s nothing like a cold beer after a long run. Two new studies, however, show a close relationship between alcohol intake and physical activity, suggesting that exercise may even directly influence the amount people drink and when.

One of the studies includes research conducted by Pennsylvania State University, which looked at the lifestyles of 150 adult men and women from ages 18 to 75. Participants were asked to complete detailed questionnaires and to document their daily drinking and exercise activity using a provided smartphone app for three weeks. Volunteers continued to record their activity three additional periods throughout the year.

Related: Best Drinks For Weight Loss

Results found that on the days people exercised more than usual, they also tended to drink more. Age, gender, and season didn’t influence these findings. This connection, however, did not mean that exercise causes heavy drinking; more often than not, participants primarily stuck to moderate intake.

Test subjects in the second study included lab rats that showed both exercise and alcohol increased reward-processing activity in the brain. Although individually, exercise and alcohol did not have the same effects on the rodents, the high proved to be stronger when done together. Therefore, a possible explanation to how the two are interconnected could be that we want to strengthen and prolong our post-workout highs with a drink afterward. Alternative answers could include that people are more motivated to exercise after drinking because of calorie guilt and that those who work out together are more likely to socialize outside the gym or off field.

Related: What’s the Deal With Alcohol and Ibuprofen?

Although results from both these studies aren’t a cause for worry, they might make you more aware of that extra glass you’re more likely to pour the night of your workout. So keep calm and drink on (in moderation).

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / THEM TOO

Exercise and Alcohol May Be More Connected Than You Think, Study Says

There’s nothing like a cold beer after a long run. Two new studies| however| show a close relationship between alcohol intake and physical activity| suggesting that exercise may even directly influence the amount people drink and when.

One of the studies includes research conducted by Pennsylvania State University| which looked at the lifestyles of 150 adult men and women from ages 18 to 75. Participants were asked to complete detailed questionnaires and to document their daily drinking and exercise activity using a provided smartphone app for three weeks. Volunteers continued to record their activity three additional periods throughout the year.

Related: Best Drinks For Weight Loss

Results found that on the days people exercised more than usual| they also tended to drink more. Age| gender| and season didn’t influence these findings. This connection| however| did not mean that exercise causes heavy drinking; more often than not| participants primarily stuck to moderate intake.

Test subjects in the second study included lab rats that showed both exercise and alcohol increased reward-processing activity in the brain. Although individually| exercise and alcohol did not have the same effects on the rodents| the high proved to be stronger when done together. Therefore| a possible explanation to how the two are interconnected could be that we want to strengthen and prolong our post-workout highs with a drink afterward. Alternative answers could include that people are more motivated to exercise after drinking because of calorie guilt and that those who work out together are more likely to socialize outside the gym or off field.

Related: What’s the Deal With Alcohol and Ibuprofen?

Although results from both these studies aren’t a cause for worry| they might make you more aware of that extra glass you’re more likely to pour the night of your workout. So keep calm and drink on (in moderation).

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / THEM TOO

If Stairs Leave You Breathless, Are You Not as Fit as You Thought?

Why walking up the stairs is a struggle for everyone ¡ª GreatistHow your well-being can sabotage your weight-loss goals ¡ª Real SimpleThe new way to change up your interval workout ¡ª ShapeThe best foam-rolling exercises ¡ª SelfNo-crunch moves for the strongest core ever ¡ª HealthThe workout gear you’ll need for a cold Winter ¡ª Women’s HealthCheers to these tasty and healthy holiday cocktails ¡ª Cooking LightTrimming belly fat is easier with these small daily tricks ¡ª FitnessDon’t forget these healthy appetizers on your holiday menu ¡ª POPSUGAR FoodImage Source: Shutterstock

If Stairs Leave You Breathless, Are You Not as Fit as You Thought?

Why walking up the stairs is a struggle for everyone ¡ª GreatistHow your well-being can sabotage your weight-loss goals ¡ª Real SimpleThe new way to change up your interval workout ¡ª ShapeThe best foam-rolling exercises ¡ª SelfNo-crunch moves for the strongest core ever ¡ª HealthThe workout gear you’ll need for a cold Winter ¡ª Women’s HealthCheers to these tasty and healthy holiday cocktails ¡ª Cooking LightTrimming belly fat is easier with these small daily tricks ¡ª FitnessDon’t forget these healthy appetizers on your holiday menu ¡ª POPSUGAR FoodImage Source: Shutterstock

These Sleep Habits Can Cause Anxiety, Experts Say

Bad news| restless sleepers: your nightly session of disjointed z’s may be leading to more anxiety and stress during the day| according to a recent study. The small study looked at the effects of sleep deprivation on participants’ anxiety levels and found they were much higher after a sleepless night than a well-rested one. Feeling on edge? Here are a few sleep habits that may be making your stress levels skyrocket.

    Hitting the snooze button: Not only is your snoozing habit disrupting your sleep cycle| but delaying getting out of bed can also cause you to rush through your morning talk about stress. Try to forgo the snooze button and instead set your alarm for the time you have to get up. Free phone apps or fitness trackers that wake you up at the best point in your sleep cycle can help as well.Going to sleep at different times: Constantly changing when you go to bed or wake up can be the cause of sleep deprivation| since you’re not preparing your body for sleep with a relaxing routine. Try to stick to the same bedtime and wake-up time no matter what the day in order to establish a nighttime routine that will help lull yourself into a restful sleep.Not making sleep a priority: Some days| you wish there were endless hours in a day| but pulling all-nighters to catch up on your to-do list isn’t sustainable or healthy. Ensure you get at least seven hours of sleep every night by giving yourself a cutoff time when it comes to dealing with that stressful errand list in the evenings.

Related: The 10 Scary Things That Happen When You Don’t Get Enough Sleep

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / THEM TOO

These Sleep Habits Can Cause Anxiety, Experts Say

Bad news, restless sleepers: your nightly session of disjointed z’s may be leading to more anxiety and stress during the day, according to a recent study. The small study looked at the effects of sleep deprivation on participants’ anxiety levels and found they were much higher after a sleepless night than a well-rested one. Feeling on edge? Here are a few sleep habits that may be making your stress levels skyrocket.

    Hitting the snooze button: Not only is your snoozing habit disrupting your sleep cycle, but delaying getting out of bed can also cause you to rush through your morning ¡ª talk about stress. Try to forgo the snooze button and instead set your alarm for the time you have to get up. Free phone apps or fitness trackers that wake you up at the best point in your sleep cycle can help as well.Going to sleep at different times: Constantly changing when you go to bed or wake up can be the cause of sleep deprivation, since you’re not preparing your body for sleep with a relaxing routine. Try to stick to the same bedtime and wake-up time no matter what the day in order to establish a nighttime routine that will help lull yourself into a restful sleep.Not making sleep a priority: Some days, you wish there were endless hours in a day, but pulling all-nighters to catch up on your to-do list isn’t sustainable or healthy. Ensure you get at least seven hours of sleep every night by giving yourself a cutoff time when it comes to dealing with that stressful errand list in the evenings.

Related: The 10 Scary Things That Happen When You Don’t Get Enough Sleep

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / THEM TOO

This 7-Minute Workout Targets Belly Fat

This 7-Minute Workout Targets Belly Fat

Get the printable version of this seven-minute HIIT workout here!

When it comes to high-intensity interval training (HIIT)| the pros definitely outweigh the cons. While it may feel unpleasant to push your body to go faster and harder for that short time period| the rewards are worth it: HIIT helps you blast more belly fat| save time| and burn way more calories (even after your workout is long over) than a lower-intensity workout alone. A recent study published in the American College of Sports Medicine’s Health and Fitness Journal found that a few minutes of training at almost your max can accomplish all of this in way less time than a traditional workout. How much less? Try just seven minutes total. The ACSM’s interval workout consists of 12 exercises| which should be done at an intensity of eight on a scale of 10; each exercise lasts 30 seconds| with a 10-second rest in between. Repeat the circuit if you’d like a longer workout. Keeping the intensity up u2014 and the rest periods short u2014 is key| so keep reading to learn the moves and then get going! You’ll need a mat and a chair or bench.

| Jumping Jacks

Warm up your body with a vigorous stint of jumping jacks. Do these for a total of 30 seconds.

| Wall Sit

  • Stand with your back against a wall| placing your feet about two feet out in front of you. Feet should be hip distance apart.
  • Bending your knees| slide your back down the wall until your knees are at 90-degree angles. Your knee joints should be over your ankle joints| so you may need to inch your feet further from the wall to create proper alignment. Don’t let your knees fall in on the midline of your body or sway outward.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.
    • | Push-Up

      • Start in a plank position| with palms spread out evenly and your shoulders over your wrists and legs out behind you. Pull your belly button in| and keep your back straight.
      • As you lower and exhale| bend your elbows outward to the sides. Hold at the bottom before you raise back up.
      • Do as many reps as possible in 30 seconds.

      | Crunches

      • Sit on your mat and bend your knees| planting your feet on the floor. Put your palms behind your ears.
      • As you exhale| pull your abs in and lift your upper body. Inhale as you lower back down.
      • Keep your chin down to keep your neck from straining| and make sure your ribs are aligned with your hips.
      • Do as many reps as you can in 30 seconds.

      | Chair Step-Ups

      • Find a step| a bench| or a sturdy chair that when you place your foot squarely on it| your knee is at a 90-degree angle or larger.
      • Step up 20 times| leading with the right foot| then the left| bringing both feet completely onto the bench. To return to the starting position| lead with the right foot to step down to the floor| then the left| until ending with both feet on the ground. Switch legs| and start stepping with the left foot for 20 steps.
      • To make this move more challenging| start by stepping onto the bench with your right foot| bring your left foot up and tap the bench with your left toes| then lower your left foot down to tap the floor (as shown). This is one rep. Your right foot never moves as you bend and straighten your right knee. This works best on a step or bench| something lower than a chair.
      • Repeat either move for a total of 30 seconds.

      | Squat

      • Stand with your head facing forward and your chest held up and out.
      • Place your feet shoulder width apart or slightly wider. Extend your hands straight out in front of you to help keep your balance. Sit back and down like you’re sitting into an imaginary chair. Make sure your head stays facing forward| not down (focus on something in front of you to help)| and that your upper body faces forward as well| bent slightly forward. Rather than allowing your back to round| let your lower back arch slightly as you descend.
      • Lower down so your thighs are as parallel to the floor as possible| keeping your knees over your ankles. Press your weight back into your heels.
      • Keep your body tight| and push through your heels to bring yourself back to the starting position.

      | Triceps Dips

      • Position your hands shoulder width apart on a secured bench| a stable chair| or your mat.
      • Move your bum in front of the bench with your legs bent and feet placed about hip width apart on the floor.
      • Straighten out your arms| and keep a little bend in your elbows in order to always keep tension on your triceps and off your elbow joints.
      • Now slowly bend at your elbows and lower your upper body down toward the floor until your arms are at about a 90-degree angle. Be sure to keep your back close to the bench.
      • Once you reach the bottom of the movement| slowly press off with your hands| and push yourself straight back up to the starting position.
      • Repeat as many times as you can for 30 seconds.

      | Plank

      • Lie face down on the floor| or face your mat on your knees. Place your palms so that your shoulders are aligned with your wrists close to your head.
      • Push off the floor| raising up off your knees onto your toes and spreading your fingers and pressing down with your palms. You can also try resting on your forearms as shown.
      • Contract your abdominals and pull your belly button in to keep yourself up and prevent your booty from sticking up.
      • Keep your back flat| and hold for 30 seconds.

      | High Knees/Running in Place

      Time for more cardio. March (also called high knees) or run in place for 30 seconds.

      | Lunge

      • Keep your upper body straight| with your shoulders back and relaxed and chin up (pick a point to stare at in front of you so you don’t keep looking down). Always engage your core.
      • Step forward with one leg| lowering your hips until both knees are bent at about a 90-degree angle. Make sure your front knee is directly above your ankle| not pushed out too far| and make sure your other knee doesn’t touch the floor. Keep the weight in your heels as you push back up to the starting position.
      • Repeat for a total of 30 seconds.

      | Push-Up Rotation

      • Start in a plank position| with palms spread out evenly and your shoulders over your wrists and legs out behind you. Pull your belly button in| and keep your back straight.
      • As you lower and exhale| bend your elbows outward to the sides. Hold at the bottom for one breath.
      • Raise back up to top push-up position. As you reach the top| keep moving in a fluid motion to side plank position: release your left arm and raise it to the ceiling| keeping your body in a long diagonal line. Hold for one breath| then move back into push-up position.
      • Repeat as many as you can| alternating which arm you are raising| for 30 seconds.

      | Side Plank

      • Begin in a plank position (the top of a push-up)| and roll over to your left side and plant your left heel down so you are balancing on the outside edge of your left foot. Stack your right foot on top of your left. If this is too hard| bend your left knee and place your left foot flat on the ground in front of your right leg for support.
      • Keep your right arm on your side as shown| or reach it straight up toward the ceiling to lift your waist even more.
      • Press your left fingertips into the floor to take pressure out of your wrist.
      • Hold for 30 seconds.

      | Print It

      Get the printable version of this seven-minute HIIT workout here!

The Worst Fitness Trends of All Time

The Worst Fitness Trends of All Time

Fitness is not immune to fads. We’ve all seen the commercials advertising workout equipment that won’t be used for more than a month. Our friends at Healthline have a hilarious reminder of the worst fitness trends to come and pass.

A fit figure will always be in style| but too often people want the easy way out. While fitness trends come and go| the endless supply of infomercials and fitness fads are often meant for one purpose u2014 to slim down your wallet.

From fat-burning pills to the Shake Weight| click through the slideshow to learn about some of the odder| yet strangely popular| ways people have marketed fitness.

| The Hawaii Chair

Lots of people would love to lose weight sitting down. Theyu2019re willing to slide| rock| and twist away the pounds from their waistline.

The most blatant opportunistic offender is the Hawaii Chair. Its swiveling base is supposed to tighten your abs while you sit. Unfortunately| sitting is the antithesis of exercise. Nevertheless| the makers of these chairs are millionaires now thanks to people who didnu2019t know any better.

| Things That Vibrate and Jiggle

Sure| those vibrating lap belts from the 1950s seemed like a silly way to stay in shape| but that didnu2019t stop people from making more jiggly things like the Shake Weight. This vibrating dumbbell became a media sensation on novelty value alone.

Youu2019re better off saving the $20| buying regular dumbbells| and doing time-tested exercises like curls| lifts| and presses.

| Toning Shoes

There are a lot of shoes on the market that promise to sculpt everything from your butt down just by walking. Companies like Skechers use celebrities such as Kim Kardashian and Brooke Burke to promote toning shoes as a good way to stay fit. At around $100 for the shoes| they probably cost more than the shoes youu2019re wearing now but they donu2019t do anything different| according to a study by the American Council on Exercise.

| Electric Ab Belts

Someone thought using similar shock technology utilized in some physical therapy treatments was a way for people to get a six pack. These belts shoot electrical impulses into your abs| causing your muscles to contract instantly. The hope is to have abs lean enough to scrub your shirt while youu2019re still wearing it.

Top-of-the-line ab belts can run as high as $200| which is money that can be better spent on a gym membership. The belts donu2019t work| and they can even be dangerous. Would you shock yourself for lower cholesterol? Then donu2019t do it for tighter muscles!

| Pole Dancing

This new exercise trend is all the rage among young women who want to look sexy while getting fit. As videos on the Internet illustrate| home poles often come loose or sweaty hands lose their grip. While pole dancing might bring some spice into exercise| itu2019s best left to highly trained professionals.

[Editor’s note: When done right| pole dancing is an incredible strength-training workout. When getting started| be sure to seek out a pole dancing studio and always make sure your home equipment is installed properly.]

| Weight-Loss Pills and Powders

Weight loss in a pill sounds too good to be true u2014 and it is. These u201cmiracleu201d pills that supposedly boost metabolism often contain hydroxycitric acid| chromium picolinate| or ephedra| which either have absolutely no nutritional value or can cause adverse side effects| especially on the heart.

Your money is better spent on healthier food| or even green tea| a tested way to fight obesity and protect your body against disease.

| (Most) Celebrity Fitness Videos

Jane Fonda| Cher| OJ Simpson| and that guy from Jersey Shore whou2019s always pulling up his shirt might be famous| but that doesnu2019t make them fitness experts. Thereu2019s a lot of junk peddled out there in the name of celebrity endorsement| so be wary of these fitness products. You have to wonder if youu2019ll stick with a DVD longer than some of their fame will last.

Then again| Chuck Norris made one| so they canu2019t all be bad.

| Most Everything in an Infomercial

If it includes bad actors| awkward equipment| unbelievable promises| fine print| and bleach-bottle blondes| itu2019s probably garbage. And thatu2019s the formula for almost all those late-night infomercials hocking magic equipment that target abs| buns| or anything else you want turned into steel.

If you think obtaining the body of a Greek goddess for four easy installments of $19.99 sounds ridiculous| then youu2019ve got your head on straight.

| Get More Information

The moral of the story: itu2019s not a workout if thereu2019s no work involved.

The key to staying in shape is getting exercise| eating a balanced diet| and drinking adequate amounts of water. The important part of fitness is sticking to an activity. Find one you like and stick to it to get fit and stay in shape.

u2014 Brian Krans

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