10 Ingenious Kitchen Hacks That Help Make Life Healthier

10 Ingenious Kitchen Hacks That Help Make Life Healthier

Making your kitchen a healthy haven should not feel like a constant struggle. Whether you’re constantly chopping| tossing leftover produce| or talking yourself out of enjoying your favorite foods| check all the time-saving| food-optimizing hacks we swear by.

u2014 Additional reporting by Jenny Sugar and Michele Foley

| DIY Smoothie Packs

If you’re not prepared| making a smoothie can turn into a 15-minute production! These DIY smoothie packs are the perfect solution to this predicament. Prep all the fruits and greens you use in your smoothies| and freeze individual serving sizes in quart-sized freezer bags (glass mason jars work well too). Note any additional ingredients that need to be added to the blender| and your smoothie is as good as done.

| Sub in Avocado

Rich and decadent dishes get a lightened-up makeover from one amazing ingredient: avocado. Aside from adding a creamy consistency to dishes| avocado can up the fiber content and heart-healthy fats in your favorite recipes. The next time you’re making a dish that calls for milk| butter| cream| or cheese| you’ll want to take a look at our avocado-substitution guide to see how easy it is to replace those ingredients with the green goodness of this fruit.

| Divide Your Salad

Buying in bulk saves money| but how frustrating is it when a funky aroma and wilted greens greet you from the crisper drawer? Try this trick: divide your big container of greens into two to four smaller plastic bags. Place your fist over the opening| blowing through your hand and into the bag to fill it with air (carbon dioxide). Then seal the bag by twisting the top a few times before closing it firmly with a twist tie. Place it in the fridge| and your greens are good to go.

| Skip the Pasta u2014 Bring in the Veggies

Swapping out noodles for veggies is all the rage for good reason. It’s an easy technique to cut carbs and bring more nutrition to your plate. Check out these veggie noodle recipes to see how to make best use of your spaghetti squash| zucchini| and more.

| Pack (Crisp) Salads For a Full Week

Don’t have time to cut up a salad every single night? There’s a way to make all the salads you need for your workweek at once. Whether you prefer plastic containers or mason jars| here are the directions you need to know. Once you read through these| you’ll never have to deal with a mushy salad again.

| Bring Beans to Dessert

Considering beans’ fiber| protein| and iron content| everyone should include more legumes in their diet. If you’re having trouble stomaching a bowl of beans| you can still reap the healthy benefits without your taste buds even realizing it. There are tons of bean-loaded dessert recipes to appeal to your sweet tooth.

| Freeze Your Greens

Tired of tossing greens week after week? This ice-cube hack will help you out. Pick up some BPA-free ice cube trays or baby food trays| and buy a variety of greens. You can puree them separately in a food processor or blender or puree them together| adding a little water to yield a smooth consistency. Pour the puree into the little wells| attach the lids| and freeze them. Once the cubes are frozen| you can leave them in the trays or pop them out into gallon-sized freezer bags. When you’re ready to make your smoothie| just grab a few| and throw them in your blender u2014 it’s a great time saver.

You can also use ice trays to store herbs and sauces| too.

| Go Greek

Skip oil| butter| and heavy cream| and bump up levels of calcium| protein| and probiotics by using Greek yogurt. It can easily sub in for mayo| sour cream| or heavy milk in your favorite recipes.

| Store For Freshness

Just tossing your produce is the fridge won’t make it last. Check out a simple chart that lays out where to store your most common produce| whether at room temperature| on a refrigerator shelf| or in the crisper (the coldest fridge drawer). Print out this PDF from POPSUGAR Food| and post it on your fridge for reference.

| Bake With Applesauce

Applesauce works as a substitute for both eggs and butter. The ratio of applesauce to butter is one to one: if a recipe calls for 1/2 cup of butter| simply sub in 1/2 cup of applesauce. For every large egg a recipe requires| toss 1/4 cup of applesauce in its place. Try out this banana apple chunk bread in which the applesauce complements the other fruity flavors while keeping each bite dreamy and moist.

If You Want to Cook Healthy, These Kitchen Items Are a Must

If You Want to Cook Healthy| These Kitchen Items Are a Must

Abs aren’t the only thing made in the kitchen. So are tight buns| shapely thighs| and chiseled arms. No matter how hard you’re working in the gym| if you put garbage in your mouth| it’ll show. That’s why it’s so important to make sure you’re eating a healthy diet| and these kitchen gadgets can help make that happen.

| Blender or NutriBullet

If you make the occassional smoothie| a basic frozen fruit ice cream| soups| all-natural nut butters| and flours from whole grains.

| Food Processor

Although a really powerful blender like a Vitamix can be used to puree just about anything| the wider base of a protein bars| unique desserts like these vegan salted caramels| as well as making your own baking ingredients like oat flour and almond meal| a food processor is a must. It can also be used to make big batches of baby food or creamy soups that you can freeze for later.

| Juicer

If you’re a huge fan of juices for their nutritional benefits| or you like to do periodic juice cleanses| you’ll save money and get the freshest juice possible by making it yourself. Beyond fresh juice blends| you can even make smoothies and almond milk with this Hurom juicer ($300).

| Crockpot

Especially in the colder months| a create healthy meals| but huge batches of them| so it’ll ensure you eat healthy for the next few days. You can make soups| filling curries| chilis| steel-cut oatmeal| layered egg casseroles| and even whole squashes.

| Immersion Blender

If you’re a creamy-soup-lover| this little gadget ($60) enables you to puree your recipe right in the pot| which is so much easier (and safer!) than pouring small patches of boiling hot soup into your blender or food processor. This means you can throw in tons of healthy ingredients like canned beans| kale| and silken tofu| and all you’ll taste is the delightful smooth texture. It can also be used to quickly mash potatoes or bananas for bread| or to chop ingredients for recipes such as veggies or nuts.

| Cast Iron Pan

If you’re freaked out by the chemicals in those nonstick pans| get your hands on a good cast iron pan (or better yet| one small and one large one). Once the pan is properly seasoned| you’ll love how it distributes heat evenly| requires less oil| can be used directly on a grill| and boosts your iron intake. It’s perfect for stir-fries| one-pan dishes like this spaghetti squash with roasted broccoli| eggs dishes like these spicy baked eggs| and skillet breads.

| Good Knives

If you’re aiming for a healthy diet| that means eating tons of fruits and veggies. So you’ll need a good set of knives ($300) to slice and chop everything from delicate tomatoes to tough squashes.

| Glass Mason Jars

A little organization and prep can make all the difference in eating healthy. If you store whole grains and dried beans in mason jars| having them all lined up and at eye level when you open your pantry will inspire you to use them more than if they’re tucked away in the plastic packages they came in. Jars of all sizes can also be used to store a week’s worth of salads| bring your morning smoothie or overnight oats to work| make fresh sprouts| or pack healthy snacks.

| Spiralizer

If you’re interested in cutting down on carbs| a vegetable noodles made out of zucchini| butternut squash| carrots| and sweet potato.

| Silpat

While this definitely isn’t something you have to have| a reusable baking sheet like a fruit leathers| crispy baked spinach chips| crunchy carrot chips| and baked tofu.

Nutritionists Reveal What to Eat at Lunchtime to Lose Weight

Lunchtime! You know scarfing down a burger and fries isn’t the best choice if you’re trying to slim down, but how do you know what is? We’ve enlisted the expertise of two nutritionists ¡ª Stephanie Clarke, RD, and Willow Jarosh, RD, of C&J Nutrition ¡ª to share the perfect equation for how to make a delicious and satisfying lunch that will help you lose weight. Follow their advice below to start seeing results.

Calories

If you’re trying to lose weight, aim for the 400-to-450 range. If you’re trying to maintain your weight, especially if you work out, aim closer to 500 calories.

Carbs

Yes, you need to eat carbs! Go for 50 to 65 grams, which is 45 to 55 percent of your lunch calories. Carbs offer your brain and your body energy, so skimping can leave you feeling sluggish. Overdoing it can also have the same affect, so stick to this range. Avoid refined carbs, like foods made with white flour and white sugar, and go for whole grains, whole grain breads and pastas, and starchy veggies and fruits.

Related: Back Off Carbs With a 1-Day Meal Plan

Protein

Go for the gold and get 20 to 30 grams of protein, which is about 17 to 25 percent of your lunch calories. A healthy dose of midday protein will help prevent the dreaded afternoon slump and will keep you feeling satisfied post-lunch so you’re less likely to reach for sugary pick-me-ups.

Fats

Including healthy fats in your lunch makes your meal more satisfying, so strive for 13 to 18 grams, which is 30 to 35 percent of your total lunch calories. Including healthful sources like nuts, seeds, oils, avocado, and olives can help beat sugar cravings later.

Fiber

Shoot for at least eight grams of fiber, which is 30 percent of the daily recommended total of 25 grams per day. Including fiber-rich carbohydrates (whole grains, starchy veggies, and fruit) and fiber-containing fats (nuts and seeds) will help you reach your fiber goals.

Sugars

Healthy lunches should have four grams of sugar or fewer, but if you enjoy foods that contain natural sugars (like grapes or dried cranberries in your salad, sweet potato or squash in soups, whole pieces of fruit, or natural sweeteners like maple syrup or honey in sauces or dressings), then aim for fewer than 20 grams of sugar. Be mindful of the hidden sugars in certain products like sandwich bread; read labels, and choose those without added sugars.

Timing

Enjoy your lunch about one to three hours after your morning snack. If you eat breakfast around 7:30 and your morning snack around 10, aim to eat lunch around 12. Or if you like to exercise at noon, enjoy your lunch when you get back around 1. If you tend to forget to eat because you’re so busy, set an alarm on your phone or computer to remind you to stop and nosh!

Related: The Best Time to Eat, Weigh Yourself, and More

A Few Examples of Perfect Lunches

Image Source: Jenny Sugar

Sesame Ginger Quinoa Salad With Vanilla Greek Yogurt (5.3 ounces) and Blueberries (1/4 cup):Calories: 462Total fat: 13.6 gSaturated fat: 1.7 gCarbs: 58.4 gFiber: 8.1 gSugars: 20.2 gProtein: 28.1 g

Image Source: Lizzie Fuhr

Spinach Feta Wrap With a Pear and Raw Almonds (14):Calories: 452Total fat: 19.5 gSaturated fat: 5.1 gCarbs: 54.1 gFiber: 12.2 gSugars: 20.4 gProtein: 20.5 g

Image Source: Jenny Sugar

Butternut Squash Lentil Soup With a Slice of Whole Wheat Bread Smeared With Avocado (1/4 fruit):Calories: 433Total fat: 9.5 gSaturated fat: 1.6 gCarbs: 67 gFiber: 22.4 gSugars: 20.2 gProtein: 22.3 g

Image Source: Lizzie Fuhr

Greek-Yogurt Chicken Salad on a Whole Wheat Pita With an Apple and Salted Cashews (10):Calories: 483Total fat: 14.1 gSaturated fat: 3.2 gCarbs: 63.8 gFiber: 10.1 gSugars: 22.5 gProtein: 29.7 gSnack Mistakes to AvoidWaiting until you’re famished: Busy schedules can make hitting that midday meal tough, but avoid heading to lunch when you’re starving. Not only will you inhale your lunch quickly and reach for more food because your body hasn’t had time to register that it’s full, but also, it can also throw off your natural hunger and fullness cues for the rest of the afternoon, which can lead to eating more later in the day.Eating out: Do you know how many calories are in that soup and salad you ordered from the cafe? It seems like a healthy lunch, but hidden high-calorie ingredients could make your lunch well over 600 calories. Pack lunch from home so you know exactly how much you’re eating. Not taking a break: When you mindlessly gobble down your lunch while doing something else like working or watching TV, your mind will be too distracted to be able to fully register each bite, so you’ll tend to take in or crave more calories. Get away from your desk, get outside, or eat lunch with a friend.

Looking for other daily eating habits that will help you lose weight? Here’s what to eat for breakfast, for dinner, and at snack time to lose weight.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Jenny Sugar

Nutritionists Reveal What to Eat at Lunchtime to Lose Weight

Lunchtime! You know scarfing down a burger and fries isn’t the best choice if you’re trying to slim down| but how do you know what is? We’ve enlisted the expertise of two nutritionists ¡ª Stephanie Clarke| RD| and Willow Jarosh| RD| of C&J Nutrition ¡ª to share the perfect equation for how to make a delicious and satisfying lunch that will help you lose weight. Follow their advice below to start seeing results.

Calories

If you’re trying to lose weight| aim for the 400-to-450 range. If you’re trying to maintain your weight| especially if you work out| aim closer to 500 calories.

Carbs

Yes| you need to eat carbs! Go for 50 to 65 grams| which is 45 to 55 percent of your lunch calories. Carbs offer your brain and your body energy| so skimping can leave you feeling sluggish. Overdoing it can also have the same affect| so stick to this range. Avoid refined carbs| like foods made with white flour and white sugar| and go for whole grains| whole grain breads and pastas| and starchy veggies and fruits.

Related: Back Off Carbs With a 1-Day Meal Plan

Protein

Go for the gold and get 20 to 30 grams of protein| which is about 17 to 25 percent of your lunch calories. A healthy dose of midday protein will help prevent the dreaded afternoon slump and will keep you feeling satisfied post-lunch so you’re less likely to reach for sugary pick-me-ups.

Fats

Including healthy fats in your lunch makes your meal more satisfying| so strive for 13 to 18 grams| which is 30 to 35 percent of your total lunch calories. Including healthful sources like nuts| seeds| oils| avocado| and olives can help beat sugar cravings later.

Fiber

Shoot for at least eight grams of fiber| which is 30 percent of the daily recommended total of 25 grams per day. Including fiber-rich carbohydrates (whole grains| starchy veggies| and fruit) and fiber-containing fats (nuts and seeds) will help you reach your fiber goals.

Sugars

Healthy lunches should have four grams of sugar or fewer| but if you enjoy foods that contain natural sugars (like grapes or dried cranberries in your salad| sweet potato or squash in soups| whole pieces of fruit| or natural sweeteners like maple syrup or honey in sauces or dressings)| then aim for fewer than 20 grams of sugar. Be mindful of the hidden sugars in certain products like sandwich bread; read labels| and choose those without added sugars.

Timing

Enjoy your lunch about one to three hours after your morning snack. If you eat breakfast around 7:30 and your morning snack around 10| aim to eat lunch around 12. Or if you like to exercise at noon| enjoy your lunch when you get back around 1. If you tend to forget to eat because you’re so busy| set an alarm on your phone or computer to remind you to stop and nosh!

Related: The Best Time to Eat| Weigh Yourself| and More

A Few Examples of Perfect Lunches

Image Source: Jenny Sugar

Sesame Ginger Quinoa Salad With Vanilla Greek Yogurt (5.3 ounces) and Blueberries (1/4 cup):Calories: 462Total fat: 13.6 gSaturated fat: 1.7 gCarbs: 58.4 gFiber: 8.1 gSugars: 20.2 gProtein: 28.1 g

Image Source: Lizzie Fuhr

Spinach Feta Wrap With a Pear and Raw Almonds (14):Calories: 452Total fat: 19.5 gSaturated fat: 5.1 gCarbs: 54.1 gFiber: 12.2 gSugars: 20.4 gProtein: 20.5 g

Image Source: Jenny Sugar

Butternut Squash Lentil Soup With a Slice of Whole Wheat Bread Smeared With Avocado (1/4 fruit):Calories: 433Total fat: 9.5 gSaturated fat: 1.6 gCarbs: 67 gFiber: 22.4 gSugars: 20.2 gProtein: 22.3 g

Image Source: Lizzie Fuhr

Greek-Yogurt Chicken Salad on a Whole Wheat Pita With an Apple and Salted Cashews (10):Calories: 483Total fat: 14.1 gSaturated fat: 3.2 gCarbs: 63.8 gFiber: 10.1 gSugars: 22.5 gProtein: 29.7 gSnack Mistakes to AvoidWaiting until you’re famished: Busy schedules can make hitting that midday meal tough| but avoid heading to lunch when you’re starving. Not only will you inhale your lunch quickly and reach for more food because your body hasn’t had time to register that it’s full| but also| it can also throw off your natural hunger and fullness cues for the rest of the afternoon| which can lead to eating more later in the day.Eating out: Do you know how many calories are in that soup and salad you ordered from the cafe? It seems like a healthy lunch| but hidden high-calorie ingredients could make your lunch well over 600 calories. Pack lunch from home so you know exactly how much you’re eating. Not taking a break: When you mindlessly gobble down your lunch while doing something else like working or watching TV| your mind will be too distracted to be able to fully register each bite| so you’ll tend to take in or crave more calories. Get away from your desk| get outside| or eat lunch with a friend.

Looking for other daily eating habits that will help you lose weight? Here’s what to eat for breakfast| for dinner| and at snack time to lose weight.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Jenny Sugar

This Snack Hack Can Help You Lose Weight Faster

This Snack Hack Can Help You Lose Weight Faster

Just as you map out your week of lunches (we love mason jar salads!) and dinners (here are the dos and don’ts of meal planning), getting your week’s worth of snacks ready at the beginning of the week is just as important on your road to weight loss. Four- and eight-ounce mason jars make it easy to keep portions under control, and here are some great ideas for morning and afternoon nibbles to add to them.

| Hummus and Veggies

Pack your jar full of veggies to keep the hummus on the bottom.

| Fruit, Yogurt, and Granola Parfait

If you want less sugar, use plain yogurt and plain oats instead.

| Fruit Salad

Adding a little lemon juice will prevent your fruit from browning.

| Veggies With Dip

You can use store-bought dip or make this creamy white bean dill dip.

| Dried Fruit and Nuts

Keep these jars small as nuts and dried fruit are high in calories.

| Carrots and Almonds

A unique yet delicious and fiber-full combo.

| Layered Plain Veggies

The layers make it more fun and easier to pack a week’s worth at a time.

| Chia Seed Pudding

Here’s a simple three-ingredient chia seed pudding recipe you can doll up any way you choose.

| Apples With Nut Butter

If you’re nut free, go for this homemade sunflower seed butter.

| Pretzels With Cream Cheese

Mix chopped fruit and cinnamon or veggies and herbs into the cream cheese for a sweet or savory twist.

| Energy Balls

Here are some of our favorite energy ball recipes.

Meet the New Kale of 2016: Moringa

Moringa has been revered among Ayurvedic circles for hundreds of years| but it’s currently poised to become the hot superfood of 2016. Nearly every part of the moringa oleifera| or drumstick tree| is edible and packed with vitamin C| protein| iron| and calcium. If you can’t get your hands on the fresh greens yet ¡ª not to worry ¡ª you can readily take a supplement or toss a powdered version into a smoothie to reap its benefits. Here’s why it’s worth a try:

It’s a nutritional powerhouse: Moringa has been named a superfood for good reason. It has three times the potassium of a banana| three times the calcium of milk| and two times the protein of yogurt ¡ª three grams per tablespoon! Any vegan eaters who have a tough time getting enough protein can benefit from the introduction of moringa into their diet.

It supports breastfeeding: In one study| researchers found mothers of premature babies increase their volume of breast milk after ingesting moringa capsules. While the study was small| the results are promising.

It may be used to fight cancer: In addition to being potent in antioxidants| one study found that both the leaf and bark of the moringa plant have antimalignant properties that could be beneficial when developing new cancer drugs.

¡ª Additional reporting by Michele Foley

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Anna Monette Roberts

What You Learn From 30 Days of No Booze, Sugar, Gluten, or Dairy

Blogger Grace Boyle of Small Hands, Big Ideas describes what it’s like to go through a 30-day cleanse.

I embarked on a 30-day food challenge. It was pretty strict. At a high level, I couldn’t have:

Gluten/WheatDairyBoozeSugar

That eliminates a lot of things we enjoy in our daily consumption of food. But ensures for a lot of clean eating, and it also promoted points for sleeping eight hours, five days a week of working out (I didn’t always get five, but always worked out like I do anyway), and 10 minutes a day of meditation or some sort of quiet time without technology.

Today is the last day of the challenge, and I’m happy to say I stuck to ¡ª I’m most happy about the no booze and no sugar.

The biggest win for me was about forming new habits. There are a lot of two-week cleanses or 10-day challenges, and for me, I knew I needed to do a full 30 days. I feel like anyone could do anything for 30 days, and I needed to commit to it ¡ª all or nothing. No point to skimp here or there ¡ª might as well do it all the way. Besides a few little hiccups, or not being able to control what my food was cooked in or when I ate out, I was as strict as could be.

What I learned:Clean food can be good. I scoured Instagram, Pinterest, magazines, etc. to find delicious recipes that were clean eating/Paleo-inspired, and when I cooked for people, they all enjoyed it. It wasn’t like I was limiting myself from all good food, because whole and healthy food is good too, banishing the misconception that you have to eat bland food to eat clean.I cooked a lot more. I love cooking, so that was great to get back to. Especially in the Winter, I’ve gotten into habits being so tired after work or working out, so we would resort to takeout or throwaway meals, because it was easy (frozen pizza anyone)? Not only does it save money, but it’s also good to cook together and find that balance of being creative in the kitchen.I slept better. I don’t sleep well even with a few drinks, so I slept really well the last 30 days.I felt very clear. I think it’s largely to do with gluten, but I generally didn’t feel foggy. Your food and diet have such a big impact on this.Self-control is an amazing thing. I felt powerful and loved knowing that I didn’t “need” anything and that I’m not addicted to anything. It’s a good feeling to be able to say no and put my foot down, and that’s that.Muscle weighs more than fat ¡ª go by how you feel. The point is to feel good. I don’t own a scale, and with all the heavy lifting I do at CrossFit, my weight doesn’t really reflect what I look like (or feel like). I did weigh myself near the end of the challenge at a doctor’s appointment, and I was let down to realize I weighed the same as I remembered, perhaps even more. After talking myself off a ledge, I reminded myself that I feel good and fit into clothes far better than before. I also measured inches before and after, and lost a total of 7.5 inches (waist, bust, thighs), which is where it really matters for me. In my waist alone, I am down 3.5 inches.This particular challenge eliminated not only sugar but also healthy ones like honey, for instance, so because this challenge is so strict, it isn’t really that sustainable. I still want to have the flexibility to go out and enjoy with friends, but I think I’ve swung the pendulum back. I think, for most of the time, I will eat clean and, for a smaller percentage, eat when I feel good and right without being stressed. Now that I saw that I can do it and that I feel better overall, I’m apt to try it more often than not.If you set your mind to it, you can do it. The biggest fear I had, was that I would fail and that I wasn’t strong enough. That I’m just that fat kid who wants to eat a bag of cookies and can’t restrain myself (parts of this may always be true because I truly love food). I held off on similar challenges at my own CrossFit gym because of the pressure and I felt too overwhelmed. Finally with other co-workers doing this with me and feeling stuffed from the holidays, I decided to take the leap. It’s a huge resurgence for me to remember that my physical and mental toughness is strong. I did have a few freak-outs during the 30-day period, I’ll admit that, and there were times where I had to forgo social outings. I missed certain foods a lot or watched everyone indulge in cheese and wine while I chugged soda water, but it was worth it. And I made it. Unscathed even!

Although today is the last day, I’m not rushing off to get a bottle of wine and I will keep cooking more and probably eating like I have for the last 30 days (with some windows for fun). For now, I’m going to give myself a hug and relax a little though. ‘Cause, I did it!

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Jae Payne

3 Ways the ‘Magical Fruit’ Can Help You Lose Weight

Beans may be known mostly for their unpleasant odiferous side effect when eaten, but beans are actually nutritious little gems. If you follow these tips, you can eat beans without the bloat, which means you can reap these weight-loss benefits. Here are three reasons to plate-up with beans.

Hello, Fiber!

While the fiber content of beans helps keep things moving, it also gives you that “I’m full” feeling. Satiating your hunger is the key to preventing overeating and consuming too many calories for the day. But you don’t just need to eat a plate of plain beans; in fact, you can add beans to smoothies ¡ª you won’t be able to taste them at all. Or throw them in your scrambled eggs, add them to soups, pasta dishes, or as a topping on homemade pizza.

Related: High-Protein Vanilla Milkshake Smoothie Made With Tofu

Protein Punch

Beans aren’t just for vegetarians. Omnivores can soak up bean protein as well. High-protein beans help keep energy and blood-sugar levels stable, which helps prevent cravings for sugary pick-me-ups that tend to be high in calories and void of nutrition. Since a couple hours between meals tends to be common crash times, including beans for breakfast and lunch will keep you peppy until your next meal. Whip up a sweet potato, chickpea, and quinoa veggie burger, a plate of polenta with beans, or a satisfying bowl of slow cooker chickpea coconut curry.

Related: Satisfy Chocolate Cravings With This Low-Calorie Chocolate Chickpea Snack

Smart Snacking

When trying to beat the scale, you need to make sure that you’re eating quality foods low in calories and high in nutrition. Beans make perfect snacks too, so look beyond the typical carrot sticks and hummus pick-me-up and try pairing your fruit with this chocolate hummus. You can snack on honey-roasted cinnamon chickpeas, veggies with creamy white-bean dip, or these delicious edamame pear crostinis. You can also enjoy a low-cal dessert with fortified with beans, like these peanut butter oatmeal raisin cookies or black bean brownies.

Related: Best Healthy Snack Recipes

Image Source: Jenny Sugar