Get Energized With This Pumpkin Buckwheat Power Bowl

The following post was originally featured on Eating Bird Food and written by Brittany Mullins, who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

Love oatmeal but want to switch it up? I’ve got a lovely, Fall-inspired buckwheat porridge recipe for you!

Despite what its name would lead you to believe, buckwheat doesn’t contain any wheat, and it’s actually not even a real grain. It’s a pseudograin (the same as quinoa), so it’s naturally wheat and gluten free. It’s also higher in protein than wheat, corn, rice, and millet!

I recently went through our pantry and found that I had stockpiled a ton of bulk-bin items, one of which was buckwheat groats. I posted about it on Instagram, and apparently I’m not the only food hoarder out there. That made me feel a tiny bit better, but I still think my collection is a bit ridiculous, so I’m on a mission to use them all up before buying any more.

Not really sure what I was going to do with the buckwheat, I decided to soak and sprout them. I’ve only tried sprouting a few times, but it really isn’t hard, and it was so fun to watch the little sprouts form. Maybe I’m just crazy, but I love watching stuff grow, sprout, etc. It’s like magic!

You do have to have a little patience because it does take a couple days to get your sprouts. Usually I’m the most inpatient person I know, but the sprouting worked to my advantage, because by the time the groats had finished soaking/sprouting, I had come up with a recipe idea.

I used sprouted buckwheat groats in the recipe because I had the extra time and there are many benefits of sprouting. If you want to sprout yours, here’s a great guide I found.

That said, if you don’t have the time for sprouting, just be sure you soak and rinse the buckwheat groats, as it makes them easier to digest, and the nutrients more readily absorbed in your body. After soaking, the groats may be a little slimy ¡ª that’s perfectly normal: just rinse them and use them according to the recipe.

So for this buckwheat power bowl, I cooked it up the same way I cook stove-top oats. I used unsweetened vanilla almond milk and banana slices for a hint of sweetness and then added the canned pumpkin and pumpkin spice seasoning for a little taste of Fall. The buckwheat gives the bowl a distinct nutty flavor and a lovely boost of volume and creaminess.

To give it a powerful nutrient boost (and make it pretty), I topped the bowl with chia seeds, dried apple slices, cranberries, and pecans.

Time to dig in!

I think this bowl is perfectly sweet on its own, especially with a little dried fruit on top, but feel free to sprinkle on a little coconut sugar or a drizzle of maple syrup if you need it to be sweeter. I enjoyed the first serving warm, well, semiwarm, since I had to take photos of it (blogger problems!). I ate the second serving for breakfast this morning cold, straight from the fridge like overnight oats. It was delicious both ways!

Pumpkin Buckwheat Porridge Power Bowl

Eating Bird Food

Pumpkin Buckwheat Porridge Power Bowl

Notes

If you¡¯re new to buckwheat groats, look for the raw version, not the toasted version, which is often called kasha. You¡¯ll likely find it at your local health food store in the bulk-bin section or in the grain aisle.

Serving size: 1 bowl without toppings | Calories: 245 | Fat: 3 | Carbohydrates: 50 | Sugar: 10 | Fiber: 9 | Protein: 7

Get Energized With This Pumpkin Buckwheat Power Bowl

The following post was originally featured on Eating Bird Food and written by Brittany Mullins| who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

Love oatmeal but want to switch it up? I’ve got a lovely| Fall-inspired buckwheat porridge recipe for you!

Despite what its name would lead you to believe| buckwheat doesn’t contain any wheat| and it’s actually not even a real grain. It’s a pseudograin (the same as quinoa)| so it’s naturally wheat and gluten free. It’s also higher in protein than wheat| corn| rice| and millet!

I recently went through our pantry and found that I had stockpiled a ton of bulk-bin items| one of which was buckwheat groats. I posted about it on Instagram| and apparently I’m not the only food hoarder out there. That made me feel a tiny bit better| but I still think my collection is a bit ridiculous| so I’m on a mission to use them all up before buying any more.

Not really sure what I was going to do with the buckwheat| I decided to soak and sprout them. I’ve only tried sprouting a few times| but it really isn’t hard| and it was so fun to watch the little sprouts form. Maybe I’m just crazy| but I love watching stuff grow| sprout| etc. It’s like magic!

You do have to have a little patience because it does take a couple days to get your sprouts. Usually I’m the most inpatient person I know| but the sprouting worked to my advantage| because by the time the groats had finished soaking/sprouting| I had come up with a recipe idea.

I used sprouted buckwheat groats in the recipe because I had the extra time and there are many benefits of sprouting. If you want to sprout yours| here’s a great guide I found.

That said| if you don’t have the time for sprouting| just be sure you soak and rinse the buckwheat groats| as it makes them easier to digest| and the nutrients more readily absorbed in your body. After soaking| the groats may be a little slimy ¡ª that’s perfectly normal: just rinse them and use them according to the recipe.

So for this buckwheat power bowl| I cooked it up the same way I cook stove-top oats. I used unsweetened vanilla almond milk and banana slices for a hint of sweetness and then added the canned pumpkin and pumpkin spice seasoning for a little taste of Fall. The buckwheat gives the bowl a distinct nutty flavor and a lovely boost of volume and creaminess.

To give it a powerful nutrient boost (and make it pretty)| I topped the bowl with chia seeds| dried apple slices| cranberries| and pecans.

Time to dig in!

I think this bowl is perfectly sweet on its own| especially with a little dried fruit on top| but feel free to sprinkle on a little coconut sugar or a drizzle of maple syrup if you need it to be sweeter. I enjoyed the first serving warm| well| semiwarm| since I had to take photos of it (blogger problems!). I ate the second serving for breakfast this morning cold| straight from the fridge like overnight oats. It was delicious both ways!

Pumpkin Buckwheat Porridge Power Bowl

Eating Bird Food

Pumpkin Buckwheat Porridge Power Bowl

Notes

If you¡¯re new to buckwheat groats| look for the raw version| not the toasted version| which is often called kasha. You¡¯ll likely find it at your local health food store in the bulk-bin section or in the grain aisle.

Serving size: 1 bowl without toppings | Calories: 245 | Fat: 3 | Carbohydrates: 50 | Sugar: 10 | Fiber: 9 | Protein: 7

Cut Calories and Sugar With This Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte Hack

The following post was originally featured on Eating Bird Food and written by Brittany Mullins, who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

More pumpkin¡­ are you surprised?

Probably not.

If you like the thought of a Pumpkin Spice Latte from Starbucks but would rather skip the extra calories and sugar, you are going to love the homemade version I’m featuring today. It’s crazy to me that even the smallest size (a tall) non-fat, no whip PSL from Starbucks has 200 calories and 37 grams of sugar! The sugary syrup is the culprit. It contains sugar, condensed nonfat milk, sweet condensed nonfat milk and a few other ingredients including coloring and artificial flavors. It’s also good to know this in case you are vegan; even if you order a soy latte without the whipped cream, it’s not vegan since the syrup has dairy.

I’m all about keeping my food/beverages as natural as possible, which is why I love this homemade version. You can have this homemade PSL any day of the week (and feel good about it) because it contains all-natural ingredients, no added sugar and a low amount of calories. The best part: it doesn’t cost $4 a pop.

Healthy Pumpkin Spice Latte

From Eating Bird Food

Healthy Pumpkin Spice Latte

Notes

I used cold-brewed Pumpkin Spice coffee from Fresh Market, which tasted divine, but you can certainly use any flavor coffee you love. And then the magic happens! I used to have a mini frother that does such a good job at making foamy milk without a milk steamer but I now own a Breville Milk Frother. It’s more expensive but it’s way better. I highly recommend it.

You might find some pumpkin pulp at the bottom of your glass and that’s totally normal. Starbucks would have it too ¡ª if they were using natural ingredients and not syrup.

Cut Calories and Sugar With This Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte Hack

The following post was originally featured on Eating Bird Food and written by Brittany Mullins| who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

More pumpkin¡­ are you surprised?

Probably not.

If you like the thought of a Pumpkin Spice Latte from Starbucks but would rather skip the extra calories and sugar| you are going to love the homemade version I’m featuring today. It’s crazy to me that even the smallest size (a tall) non-fat| no whip PSL from Starbucks has 200 calories and 37 grams of sugar! The sugary syrup is the culprit. It contains sugar| condensed nonfat milk| sweet condensed nonfat milk and a few other ingredients including coloring and artificial flavors. It’s also good to know this in case you are vegan; even if you order a soy latte without the whipped cream| it’s not vegan since the syrup has dairy.

I’m all about keeping my food/beverages as natural as possible| which is why I love this homemade version. You can have this homemade PSL any day of the week (and feel good about it) because it contains all-natural ingredients| no added sugar and a low amount of calories. The best part: it doesn’t cost $4 a pop.

Healthy Pumpkin Spice Latte

From Eating Bird Food

Healthy Pumpkin Spice Latte

Notes

I used cold-brewed Pumpkin Spice coffee from Fresh Market| which tasted divine| but you can certainly use any flavor coffee you love. And then the magic happens! I used to have a mini frother that does such a good job at making foamy milk without a milk steamer but I now own a Breville Milk Frother. It’s more expensive but it’s way better. I highly recommend it.

You might find some pumpkin pulp at the bottom of your glass and that’s totally normal. Starbucks would have it too ¡ª if they were using natural ingredients and not syrup.

1 Batch of Slow-Cooker Chicken Carnitas and You’ve Got Healthy Meals For a Week

The following post was originally featured on According to Elle and written by Elle Penner, who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

It’s no secret that my love for Mexican and slow cookers runs deep. Combine the two and well, you can just imagine how excited I am about what’s happening here. Especially when I come home starving after a hella hectic Monday at work, a seemingly weekly occurrence around our house.

The literal translation of carnitas is “little meats” (does anyone else find the single dish with a plural name thing confusing, too?), a Mexican dish traditionally made by braising and then frying pork either in oil or lard, giving it that fall-off-the-bone tenderness with a crispy finish. While that all sounds totally lovely and utterly delicious, that’s not something we can (nor should) eat on the reg so I made a healthier version: chicken braised in a simple combo of OJ, lime juice and a few spices to tenderize and flavor the meat, and then briefly broiled for a still crispy but not-fried finish.

Three words: Who. Needs. Pork.

Ok, six: Fried. In. Oil.

So that might be a bit dramatic (because legit carnitas are indeed ridiculously amazing) but for what it’s worth to your waistline, the slow cooker¨Cbroiler combo is pretty darn good too. The citrus juices and spices leave behind so much flavor. Besides the fact that they’re delicious and good for you, here are two other reasons I love these slow cooker chicken carnitas:

    They’re stupid easy. I kid you not ¡ª they pretty much make themselves. It took five minutes to get everything into the slow cooker and 10 minutes to brown them in the skillet. The rest of the time was hands-off, taste-testing and photo shoot aside.They’re insanely versatile. I mean, you can use this chicken in literally anything that’s even remotely Mexican: tamales, tacos, burritos, nachos, quesadillas, burrito bowls, enchiladas, heck ¡ª even tossed into a bowl of tomato or black bean soup with a sprinkle of cheese and crushed tortilla chips on top. (That last one is one of my go-to single girl dinners the nights the hubs and I eat separately.)

Basically, you need these chicken carnitas in your life. And your belly. I’d give you some of mine (ours?) but the hubs and I have a burrito bowl in our future this evening and there just isn’t (aren’t?) enough. Enjoy!

To get the full recipe, check out her blog!

Image Source: Elle Penner

1 Batch of Slow-Cooker Chicken Carnitas and You’ve Got Healthy Meals For a Week

The following post was originally featured on According to Elle and written by Elle Penner| who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

It’s no secret that my love for Mexican and slow cookers runs deep. Combine the two and well| you can just imagine how excited I am about what’s happening here. Especially when I come home starving after a hella hectic Monday at work| a seemingly weekly occurrence around our house.

The literal translation of carnitas is “little meats” (does anyone else find the single dish with a plural name thing confusing| too?)| a Mexican dish traditionally made by braising and then frying pork either in oil or lard| giving it that fall-off-the-bone tenderness with a crispy finish. While that all sounds totally lovely and utterly delicious| that’s not something we can (nor should) eat on the reg so I made a healthier version: chicken braised in a simple combo of OJ| lime juice and a few spices to tenderize and flavor the meat| and then briefly broiled for a still crispy but not-fried finish.

Three words: Who. Needs. Pork.

Ok| six: Fried. In. Oil.

So that might be a bit dramatic (because legit carnitas are indeed ridiculously amazing) but for what it’s worth to your waistline| the slow cookerCbroiler combo is pretty darn good too. The citrus juices and spices leave behind so much flavor. Besides the fact that they’re delicious and good for you| here are two other reasons I love these slow cooker chicken carnitas:

    They’re stupid easy. I kid you not ¡ª they pretty much make themselves. It took five minutes to get everything into the slow cooker and 10 minutes to brown them in the skillet. The rest of the time was hands-off| taste-testing and photo shoot aside.They’re insanely versatile. I mean| you can use this chicken in literally anything that’s even remotely Mexican: tamales| tacos| burritos| nachos| quesadillas| burrito bowls| enchiladas| heck ¡ª even tossed into a bowl of tomato or black bean soup with a sprinkle of cheese and crushed tortilla chips on top. (That last one is one of my go-to single girl dinners the nights the hubs and I eat separately.)

Basically| you need these chicken carnitas in your life. And your belly. I’d give you some of mine (ours?) but the hubs and I have a burrito bowl in our future this evening and there just isn’t (aren’t?) enough. Enjoy!

To get the full recipe| check out her blog!

Image Source: Elle Penner

The Simple Tool That Can Help You Master a Headstand

The following post was originally featured on Fit Bottomed Girls and written by Jenn Walters, who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

Yoga is a funny beast.

Some poses are so welcoming to beginners ¡ª Child’s Pose! Warrior I! ¡ª while others . . . well, it takes a little more practice and a whole lot of confidence before you’re ready to attempt them in a class setting. (I’m looking at you, Half Moon Pose.)

And that’s where it is incredibly handy to have a TRX suspension trainer available. It can make some of those tricky yoga poses a little easier to do, especially if you know the right steps to take!

To learn more about each of these moves and this workout, check out Fit Bottomed Girls.

Image Source: Fit Bottomed Girls

The Simple Tool That Can Help You Master a Headstand

The following post was originally featured on Fit Bottomed Girls and written by Jenn Walters| who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

Yoga is a funny beast.

Some poses are so welcoming to beginners ¡ª Child’s Pose! Warrior I! ¡ª while others . . . well| it takes a little more practice and a whole lot of confidence before you’re ready to attempt them in a class setting. (I’m looking at you| Half Moon Pose.)

And that’s where it is incredibly handy to have a TRX suspension trainer available. It can make some of those tricky yoga poses a little easier to do| especially if you know the right steps to take!

To learn more about each of these moves and this workout| check out Fit Bottomed Girls.

Image Source: Fit Bottomed Girls

Get Creative With This Full-Body Box Workout

The following post was originally featured on Fit Bottomed Girls and written by Jenn Walters, who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

Simple enough, right? Don’t let its simplicity fool you. This is a full-body workout that’ll have your arms wanting to fall off and your biscuits burning. (It doesn’t feel like that many walking lunges when you start, BUT IT IS.) I did the whole workout with 15-pound dumbbells and a 16-kilo kettlebell (you could always swing a dumbbell if you don’t have a kettlebell), and I could feel it the next day. Which is always the sign of a successful workout, right?

This is a great one to do with a group, too. Just put on some tunes and get to going through the box!

To learn more about each of these moves and this workout, check out Fit Bottomed Girls.

Image Source: Fit Bottomed Girls

Get Creative With This Full-Body Box Workout

The following post was originally featured on Fit Bottomed Girls and written by Jenn Walters| who is part of POPSUGAR Select Fitness.

Simple enough| right? Don’t let its simplicity fool you. This is a full-body workout that’ll have your arms wanting to fall off and your biscuits burning. (It doesn’t feel like that many walking lunges when you start| BUT IT IS.) I did the whole workout with 15-pound dumbbells and a 16-kilo kettlebell (you could always swing a dumbbell if you don’t have a kettlebell)| and I could feel it the next day. Which is always the sign of a successful workout| right?

This is a great one to do with a group| too. Just put on some tunes and get to going through the box!

To learn more about each of these moves and this workout| check out Fit Bottomed Girls.

Image Source: Fit Bottomed Girls