This Treadmill Workout Will Probably Be the Most Intense 30 Minutes of Your Day

It didn’t take much convincing to see why Sandra Bullock, Amanda Seyfried, and Kim Kardashian all flock to Barry’s Bootcamp ¡ª 15 minutes into my first class, I was in love. The hourlong mix of high-intensity treadmill intervals and circuit training left me a sweaty mess, and I was already planning my next class on the way out of my first.

While nothing beats the full 60-minute class, the running segments are a workout on their own. For days when strength training isn’t in the mix, we have a 30-minute treadmill workout from Barry’s Bootcamp trainer Alycia Stevenin to give you a taste of what the class is like. You’ll move through sections of intervals, hill work, and sprints, which will challenge both your endurance and speed. While the workout is meant to be done as a whole, you can easily pull out any section and repeat it four to five times if you’d prefer to focus on a specific area.

Ready to do this at the gym? Take our printable workout with you!

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography

This Treadmill Workout Will Probably Be the Most Intense 30 Minutes of Your Day

It didn’t take much convincing to see why Sandra Bullock| Amanda Seyfried| and Kim Kardashian all flock to Barry’s Bootcamp ¡ª 15 minutes into my first class| I was in love. The hourlong mix of high-intensity treadmill intervals and circuit training left me a sweaty mess| and I was already planning my next class on the way out of my first.

While nothing beats the full 60-minute class| the running segments are a workout on their own. For days when strength training isn’t in the mix| we have a 30-minute treadmill workout from Barry’s Bootcamp trainer Alycia Stevenin to give you a taste of what the class is like. You’ll move through sections of intervals| hill work| and sprints| which will challenge both your endurance and speed. While the workout is meant to be done as a whole| you can easily pull out any section and repeat it four to five times if you’d prefer to focus on a specific area.

Ready to do this at the gym? Take our printable workout with you!

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography

The Simple Technique That Will Help You Run Longer

Ever wonder why some days you feel like you can keep running and running while on others you have zero stamina? Certainly the amount of sleep you got the night before, stress levels, and diet play a role in how you perform during your runs, but how you regulate your breath during your jogging session also affects your energy levels. Here’s how to power your muscles with fresh oxygen on each stride.

Learn to breathe deeply: Your lungs are just a bit smaller than your rib cage, but most people tend to use just the top third of this powerful organ. When you take a deep breath, you are expanding the lungs, pressing down the diaphragm, and causing your abdomen to expand as your lungs fill with air. Learning to breathe this way while running helps you take in a lot of oxygen, preventing dizziness and nausea. With a little training and some stretching, you can breathe to your full potential and increase your endurance. Cross-training with yoga and Pilates can also help you learn to breathe from your diaphragm. Here are some tips for how to conquer diaphragmatic breathing.

Match your breathing to your steps: For an easy-paced run, inhale for three or four steps, then exhale for the same amount. Count the steps in your head while you adjust to breathing on tempo. If you are running more intensely, your breathing tempo will increase to support your increased energy output and become faster ¡ª a breath in for one to two steps and out for one to two steps. If you can’t match your steps to your breathing tempo, then you are trying to run too fast; slow down, and get back into your rhythm.

Breathe differently in cooler temps: It’s important to breathe through your nose while running in chillier weather, because cold air is dry and breathing through your mouth increases the dryness while decreasing the temperature of the air. Since your lungs do not like dry air, you can experience asthma-like symptoms, like wheezing and coughing, when breathing cold air in through your mouth. Breathing through your nose not only filters out air impurities but also warms cool air to body temperature, creating less shock for the lungs to decrease those asthma-like symptoms.

Learn to breathe through your nose: If nose breathing is difficult for you, start experimenting with the technique now before the temperature drops drastically. Breathing through the nose helps you breathe more deeply and efficiently, which will ultimately help your running no matter what the temperature is. If you plan to run in cold temps and have yet to master nose breathing, you can try wearing a bandana (or a shirt that can be pulled up far) over your nose and mouth to help trap the moisture of your breath and humidity in the air before it reaches your lungs.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Ericka McConnell

The Simple Technique That Will Help You Run Longer

Ever wonder why some days you feel like you can keep running and running while on others you have zero stamina? Certainly the amount of sleep you got the night before| stress levels| and diet play a role in how you perform during your runs| but how you regulate your breath during your jogging session also affects your energy levels. Here’s how to power your muscles with fresh oxygen on each stride.

Learn to breathe deeply: Your lungs are just a bit smaller than your rib cage| but most people tend to use just the top third of this powerful organ. When you take a deep breath| you are expanding the lungs| pressing down the diaphragm| and causing your abdomen to expand as your lungs fill with air. Learning to breathe this way while running helps you take in a lot of oxygen| preventing dizziness and nausea. With a little training and some stretching| you can breathe to your full potential and increase your endurance. Cross-training with yoga and Pilates can also help you learn to breathe from your diaphragm. Here are some tips for how to conquer diaphragmatic breathing.

Match your breathing to your steps: For an easy-paced run| inhale for three or four steps| then exhale for the same amount. Count the steps in your head while you adjust to breathing on tempo. If you are running more intensely| your breathing tempo will increase to support your increased energy output and become faster a breath in for one to two steps and out for one to two steps. If you can’t match your steps to your breathing tempo| then you are trying to run too fast; slow down| and get back into your rhythm.

Breathe differently in cooler temps: It’s important to breathe through your nose while running in chillier weather| because cold air is dry and breathing through your mouth increases the dryness while decreasing the temperature of the air. Since your lungs do not like dry air| you can experience asthma-like symptoms| like wheezing and coughing| when breathing cold air in through your mouth. Breathing through your nose not only filters out air impurities but also warms cool air to body temperature| creating less shock for the lungs to decrease those asthma-like symptoms.

Learn to breathe through your nose: If nose breathing is difficult for you| start experimenting with the technique now before the temperature drops drastically. Breathing through the nose helps you breathe more deeply and efficiently| which will ultimately help your running no matter what the temperature is. If you plan to run in cold temps and have yet to master nose breathing| you can try wearing a bandana (or a shirt that can be pulled up far) over your nose and mouth to help trap the moisture of your breath and humidity in the air before it reaches your lungs.

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Ericka McConnell

Runner Gets Called a Dumb B*tch, and a Little Boy Comes to the Rescue

Julia Price was out enjoying a lovely run, when it was almost ruined by a well-dressed man, eating outside on his lunch break. He yelled, “Sexy lady, hey, hey, hey, sexy lady!” so loud, she could hear it over the music blaring in her headphones. She took the high road and reacted the same way most of us would by just ignoring him. But then he took it to the next level and said, “eff you, dumb b*tch!”

Oh no, not the “B” word! She tore off her headphones, prepared to stand up for herself, but she didn’t have to. A little boy walking with his mother and sister called, “Hey. That is not nice to say to her, and she didn’t like you yelling at her. You shouldn’t do that because she is a nice girl, and I don’t let anyone say mean things to people. She’s a girl like my sister, and I will protect her.”

I was on my usual running path when I heard an older man yelling loudly enough for me to hear through my headphones. “…Posted by Julia Price on Wednesday, 18 November 2015

The man felt embarrassed as he should, and Julia turned to the little boy’s mother and asked if she could thank him with a hug. James, the brave boy, just shrugged and said, “Well I just wanted to make sure your heart was OK.”

Um, we don’t know about Julia, but our hearts are melting. After posting the moving story to her Facebook page, Julia ended by thanking the moms and dads of the world for “raising the next generation to be brave and courageous and to be little earth angels for all. I am so touched.” So are we, Julia. According to James’s mom, “this is a typical day in the life of James.” Hopefully this story will inspire other people to be more like James, so catcallers, beware!

Related: Before Running Alone, Read This

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Ericka McConnell

Runner Gets Called a Dumb B*tch, and a Little Boy Comes to the Rescue

Julia Price was out enjoying a lovely run| when it was almost ruined by a well-dressed man| eating outside on his lunch break. He yelled| “Sexy lady| hey| hey| hey| sexy lady!” so loud| she could hear it over the music blaring in her headphones. She took the high road and reacted the same way most of us would by just ignoring him. But then he took it to the next level and said| “eff you| dumb b*tch!”

Oh no| not the “B” word! She tore off her headphones| prepared to stand up for herself| but she didn’t have to. A little boy walking with his mother and sister called| “Hey. That is not nice to say to her| and she didn’t like you yelling at her. You shouldn’t do that because she is a nice girl| and I don’t let anyone say mean things to people. She’s a girl like my sister| and I will protect her.”

I was on my usual running path when I heard an older man yelling loudly enough for me to hear through my headphones. “…Posted by Julia Price on Wednesday| 18 November 2015

The man felt embarrassed as he should| and Julia turned to the little boy’s mother and asked if she could thank him with a hug. James| the brave boy| just shrugged and said| “Well I just wanted to make sure your heart was OK.”

Um| we don’t know about Julia| but our hearts are melting. After posting the moving story to her Facebook page| Julia ended by thanking the moms and dads of the world for “raising the next generation to be brave and courageous and to be little earth angels for all. I am so touched.” So are we| Julia. According to James’s mom| “this is a typical day in the life of James.” Hopefully this story will inspire other people to be more like James| so catcallers| beware!

Related: Before Running Alone| Read This

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Ericka McConnell

5 Ways to Make Running Feel Easier

Lacing up those sneaks the first few times can feel so hard. Your muscles ache, your lungs burn, it’s hard to breathe, and all you can think about is stopping. Don’t give up! Here are five techniques to incorporate every week to help running feel like a breeze instead of a chore.

Pencil It In

In order for your body to become more accustomed to the demands running places on it, you have to run regularly. Instead of fitting in random runs whenever you can or when the weather is nice, it’s imperative to stick with a weekly running schedule that includes running at least three or four times a week. Running often will strengthen the muscles in your lower body and core that are needed to make running feel easier, and it will also build your endurance. Ease into running regularly with shorter runs, and as it begins to feel easier, gradually increase the mileage per workout.

Slow Down

There’s no need to start off running seven-minute miles. Slow down your speed enough so you’re breathing faster than you would if just walking, but not huffing and puffing so much that your lungs hurt or you’re gasping for each breath. Skip the interval training, because even though it’s great for targeting belly fat, running at a comfortable, consistent pace is easier than sprinting. Slowing down will allow you to focus on correct running form, which can alleviate common running aches, and you’ll also be able to take in the scenery or have the energy to chat with your workout buddy, all of which can actually make you love going out for a run. As your body becomes stronger, your pace will increase naturally, and you can begin to challenge it with sprinting intervals.

Make It Fun

If you hate every second of your run, you’re doing something wrong. Find ways to make it enjoyable either by bringing your dog or best friend along, exploring running in new places, listening to your favorite tunes or a book on tape, splurging on new gear, tracking your run with an app, or running near water so after your run you can jump in to cool off.

Hills and Squats

Having strong leg muscles will make running feel like a breeze. One way is to incorporate leg-strengthening work into your runs by adding hills. Running uphill will feel incredibly challenging, but as soon as you get to the top and start running on a flat surface, you’ll be amazed at how much easier running feels. Or you can focus on toning your lower body when you’re not out for a run, with moves like squats, lunges, or step-ups, or try this yoga sequence for runners.

Don’t Just Run

Running regularly will train your body to make running feel easier, but if running is the only workout you do, boredom and repetitive-stress injuries can make it unbearable. Mix up your cardio routine with biking, hiking, dancing, or swimming. Doing other types of cardio will strengthen your body in different ways, so every time you lace up your sneaks, it’ll feel easier to head out for a run. But the best part about taking breaks from running is that it’ll actually make you miss it, and if you’re excited to get out for a run, it’ll make it that much more enjoyable.

Related: A Belly-Fat-Blasting, Booty-Burning Treadmill Workout

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Kat Borchat

5 Ways to Make Running Feel Easier

Lacing up those sneaks the first few times can feel so hard. Your muscles ache| your lungs burn| it’s hard to breathe| and all you can think about is stopping. Don’t give up! Here are five techniques to incorporate every week to help running feel like a breeze instead of a chore.

Pencil It In

In order for your body to become more accustomed to the demands running places on it| you have to run regularly. Instead of fitting in random runs whenever you can or when the weather is nice| it’s imperative to stick with a weekly running schedule that includes running at least three or four times a week. Running often will strengthen the muscles in your lower body and core that are needed to make running feel easier| and it will also build your endurance. Ease into running regularly with shorter runs| and as it begins to feel easier| gradually increase the mileage per workout.

Slow Down

There’s no need to start off running seven-minute miles. Slow down your speed enough so you’re breathing faster than you would if just walking| but not huffing and puffing so much that your lungs hurt or you’re gasping for each breath. Skip the interval training| because even though it’s great for targeting belly fat| running at a comfortable| consistent pace is easier than sprinting. Slowing down will allow you to focus on correct running form| which can alleviate common running aches| and you’ll also be able to take in the scenery or have the energy to chat with your workout buddy| all of which can actually make you love going out for a run. As your body becomes stronger| your pace will increase naturally| and you can begin to challenge it with sprinting intervals.

Make It Fun

If you hate every second of your run| you’re doing something wrong. Find ways to make it enjoyable either by bringing your dog or best friend along| exploring running in new places| listening to your favorite tunes or a book on tape| splurging on new gear| tracking your run with an app| or running near water so after your run you can jump in to cool off.

Hills and Squats

Having strong leg muscles will make running feel like a breeze. One way is to incorporate leg-strengthening work into your runs by adding hills. Running uphill will feel incredibly challenging| but as soon as you get to the top and start running on a flat surface| you’ll be amazed at how much easier running feels. Or you can focus on toning your lower body when you’re not out for a run| with moves like squats| lunges| or step-ups| or try this yoga sequence for runners.

Don’t Just Run

Running regularly will train your body to make running feel easier| but if running is the only workout you do| boredom and repetitive-stress injuries can make it unbearable. Mix up your cardio routine with biking| hiking| dancing| or swimming. Doing other types of cardio will strengthen your body in different ways| so every time you lace up your sneaks| it’ll feel easier to head out for a run. But the best part about taking breaks from running is that it’ll actually make you miss it| and if you’re excited to get out for a run| it’ll make it that much more enjoyable.

Related: A Belly-Fat-Blasting| Booty-Burning Treadmill Workout

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Kat Borchat

The Fat-Blasting Model Secret: Three-Circuit Cardio Workout

This workout from Andrea Orbeck ¡ª trainer to models like Heidi Klum and the women of Victoria’s Secret ¡ª is great for those days when you need a solid routine but don’t want to go crazy. “Cardio is important to get into a fat-burning zone to keep you nice and lean,” Andrea says. This workout “breaks up the monotony of a 45-minute session.”

This simple workout is broken up into three 15-minute circuits. The first section is done at one continuous moderate-effort pace, followed by a second section broken up into intervals: three minutes at a hard pace followed by two minutes of recovery. The final section features pumped-up incline and resistance to keep the sweat going. You can do this on either a treadmill or a stationary bike; feel free to modify the level and speed suggestions below if you need something slower or faster. Remember to adjust the incline down to what is comfortable during the interval section (such as 0 or one percent incline).

Time Speed/Level

0:00-15:00Treadmill: 4 mph at 5 percent incline Bike: level 3 15:00-18:00Treadmill: 6 mph, no incline Bike: level 1018:00-20:00Treadmill: 4 mph, no incline Bike: level 320:00-23:00Treadmill: 6 mph, no incline Bike: level 1023:00-25:00Treadmill: 4 mph, no incline Bike: level 325:00-28:00Treadmill: 6 mph, no incline Bike: level 1028:00-30:00Treadmill: 4 mph, no incline Bike: level 330:00-45:00Treadmill: 4 mph at 15 percent incline Bike: level 8

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Kat Borchart

The Fat-Blasting Model Secret: Three-Circuit Cardio Workout

This workout from Andrea Orbeck ¡ª trainer to models like Heidi Klum and the women of Victoria’s Secret ¡ª is great for those days when you need a solid routine but don’t want to go crazy. “Cardio is important to get into a fat-burning zone to keep you nice and lean|” Andrea says. This workout “breaks up the monotony of a 45-minute session.”

This simple workout is broken up into three 15-minute circuits. The first section is done at one continuous moderate-effort pace| followed by a second section broken up into intervals: three minutes at a hard pace followed by two minutes of recovery. The final section features pumped-up incline and resistance to keep the sweat going. You can do this on either a treadmill or a stationary bike; feel free to modify the level and speed suggestions below if you need something slower or faster. Remember to adjust the incline down to what is comfortable during the interval section (such as 0 or one percent incline).

Time Speed/Level

0:00-15:00Treadmill: 4 mph at 5 percent incline Bike: level 3 15:00-18:00Treadmill: 6 mph| no incline Bike: level 1018:00-20:00Treadmill: 4 mph| no incline Bike: level 320:00-23:00Treadmill: 6 mph| no incline Bike: level 1023:00-25:00Treadmill: 4 mph| no incline Bike: level 325:00-28:00Treadmill: 6 mph| no incline Bike: level 1028:00-30:00Treadmill: 4 mph| no incline Bike: level 330:00-45:00Treadmill: 4 mph at 15 percent incline Bike: level 8

Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Kat Borchart